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Unique Tokyo Houses Add Individual Touch to City Landscape (Photos)Jérémie Souteyrat

French photographer Jérémie Souteyrat has scoured Tokyo for unique houses and residential scenes. Through his pictures he seeks to convey the individuality of Japanese homes and offer a fresh perspective on the capital.
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Japanese Castles

Many castles were built in Japan during the Warring States period (1467–1568), when regional leaders vied for power. Although a large number were destroyed in the centuries that followed, there are still several fine structures to visit today, including those that have been reconstructed.
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Architect Kuma Kengo’s Bank Building Unveiled in Nagoya (News)

Nagoya, June 27 (Jiji Press)—Hekikai Shinkin Bank unveiled Tuesday a new branch building in Nagoya designed by architect Kuma Kengo, the designer for the new National Stadium, the main arena for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Anjō, Aichi Prefecture-based regional bank's seven-story Misono branch building, located in Naka Ward of Nagoya in the same central Japan prefecture, fea…
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Inns and Outs: Five “Ryokan” in Tokyo

Tokyo, a city known for its high tech and blazing neon, still has traditional inns tucked away in its back streets that can provide travelers with comforts from an older age. A night at one of these establishments is a great way to top off a long day of seeing the sights. Photographer Andō Seita takes us on a tour of five ryokan that offer guests distinct ways to experience the metropolis.
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Umeda Sky Building (Photo Gallery)

Umeda Sky Building is one of Osaka’s most prominent sights. These photographs capture the uniquely designed building and the spectacular view it has of the surrounding urban landscape.
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Dramatic Architecture and Views at Osaka’s Umeda Sky Building

More than two decades after opening, Osaka’s Umeda Sky Building continues to grow as a popular sightseeing destination. Burgeoning visitor numbers include a high proportion of international tourists, thanks to praise of the building’s design in English-language media and guidebooks.
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Wood, Mold, and Japanese ArchitectureAnne Kohtz

Traditional Japanese architecture’s reliance on wood as a building material developed largely in response to Japan’s humid environment—particularly the warm, wet summer months. Raised floors and open spaces ensured proper ventilation to fight the buildup of toxic mold. Wood post-and-beam construction is also useful when designing for typhoon and earthquake resistance.
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“Shōzoku”: The Shintō VestmentsToya Manabu

The clothing worn by priests and priestesses at Shintō shrines is unlike anything you will see elsewhere in Japan. Here we describe the styles of traditional vestments that are part of the Shintō experience.
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“Shamusho”: The Shrine OfficeToya Manabu

When not engaging in religious rites, priests and shrine personnel may rest in the shamusho, or shrine office. Here visitors can also obtain talismans to protect their homes and selves with the blessing of the shrine’s kami.
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“Shintai, Shinboku”: The Divine Object or TreeToya Manabu

At the heart of the shrine, never viewed by visitors, is the shintai, the “divine body” of the kami. At some shrines this is an object, like a jewel or sword; at others, it is a natural feature like a mountain or shinboku, a divine tree.
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