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Taikan Painting Found, to Be Exhibited after 100 Years (News)

Tokyo, Oct. 13 (Jiji Press)—A Buddhist painting by renowned Japanese artist Yokoyama Taikan (1868–1958) has been found after being missing for some 100 years, and will be shown in public next year, according to MOMAT, the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo. The painting, Byakue Kannon (Kannon in White), is a portrait of the Bodhisattva Kannon (Avalokiteśvara). It will be put on show at the …
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The “Yōkai” Art of the Master

Toriyama Sekien was an influential Edo-period artist who taught some of the giants of the ukiyo-e world. Today he is best known for his collections of yōkai illustrations, which he released in four books in 1776–84 as a form of mass-produced popular literature. We spoke with the translators who have made his work available to Spanish and English readers about the artist and the impact he continues to have to this day.
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Ocean Child: Reappraising Ono Yōko’s AchievementsKusumi Kiyoshi

For many years, Ono Yōko’s putative role in the breakup of the Beatles overshadowed her own achievements as an artist and activist. Now all that is changing. Art critic Kusumi Kiyoshi adds his own insights to the ongoing reappraisal of this much-misunderstood Japanese legend.
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A Retro Manga Master’s Italian Renaissance

Italian fans have discovered the allure of the late manga artist Kamimura Kazuo, whose erotic yet poetic depiction of women elicited comparisons with ukiyo-e and whose ruthless heroines have inspired the likes of Quentin Tarantino. We talked to the translator and scholar Paolo La Marca about his love affair with Kamimura’s work.
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Japan’s Movie Theater Sign Painter: Star Power in Acrylic

When local movie theaters were important entertainment centers, sign painters played a key role in drawing spectators to the latest big film. Ōshita Takeo, who made a living for decades as a sign painter, keeps his movie passion alive by producing portraits of Japanese and international stars.
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Ties of Tradition: Ceramic Artist Katō Takuo’s Campaign to Restore Persian Lusterware to Iran

The small town of Tajimi in Gifu Prefecture, a center of Minō pottery, has become a focal point in the renaissance of the ceramic tradition of Persian lusterware three centuries after it fell into disuse. The ceramic artist Katō Takuo spent nearly two decades reviving the technique; today Kōbei, his son, is working closely with Iran to fulfill his father’s wish of restoring lusterware to the region it flourished so many years ago.
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Japan’s Animation Industry Failing to Cultivate Next Generation of Talent

With blockbusters like Shinkai Makoto’s Kimi no na wa (Your Name) making waves around the world, the Japanese animation industry would appear to be bursting with vitality. Yet behind the scenes at the nation’s animation production houses, the working conditions are little short of wretched, and the long-term future of made-in-Japan anime is anything but assured.
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Open-Air Art Draws Visitors to Disaster-Hit Ishinomaki (Japan in Photos)

A towering white deer sculpture on display at the Reborn-Art Festival in Ishinomaki, Miyagi Prefecture. The festival began on July 22 and will continue until September 10. Artworks can be seen in the city center and around the Oshika Peninsula. There will also be concerts, including an event from July 28 until 30 featuring the group Mr. Children and other performers at Kawasaki, also in Miyagi…
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Nishioka Fumio: An Armorer Bringing National Treasures Back to Life

Traditional Japanese armor combines a diverse set of different crafts and skills, including lacquer, leather, and textile work. Professional armor restorer Nishioka Fumio is one of the few people in Japan with all these skills at his command. We spoke to him about his work restoring some of the masterpieces of Japanese armor to their former glory.
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Museum of the Fallen Art Students: A Tribute to Dreams Cut Short

The student mobilization of 1943 sent thousands of young men off to die in the war effort, including many aspiring painters. In 1997, a Tokyo entrepreneur built a museum to preserve and display the works of those fallen art students. We traveled to Ueda in Nagano Prefecture to visit the Mugonkan on the eve of its twentieth anniversary and talk to 75-year-old founder and director Kuboshima Seiichirō.
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