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DP to Unite with Koike’s New Party to Fight Ruling Bloc in Coming Poll (News)

Tokyo, Sept. 27 (Jiji Press)—Democratic Party leader Maehara Seiji has made up his mind to have the main Japanese opposition party effectively unite with a new party led by popular Tokyo Governor Koike Yuriko, in a bid to defeat Prime Minister Abe Shinzō's ruling coalition in the upcoming general election, it was learned on Wednesday. The House of Representatives, the all-important lower chambe…
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Koike’s New Party Seeks to “Reset Japan” (News)

Tokyo, Sept. 27 (Jiji Press)—Tokyo Governor Koike Yuriko said Wednesday Kibō no Tō (party of hope), a new political party headed by her, will aim to "reset Japan" with bold reforms and politics not constrained by vested interests. "I'm launching Kibō no Tō in order to reset Japan," Koike told a press conference to mark her party's establishment. "Now is the time to be bold and carry out politic…
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Will Japan Move to Amend the Constitution?Takahashi Masamitsu

The ruling coalition’s upper house election victory gives Prime Minister Abe the numbers he needs to initiate a constitutional referendum. Political journalist Takahashi Masamitsu examines the hurdles the administration must clear to achieve a constitutional amendment.
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Landslide Victory for LDP in 2016 Upper House Election

The ruling coalition of the Liberal Democratic Party and Kōmeitō won comfortably in the House of Councillors election on July 10, 2016. The LDP nonetheless ended one seat short of its first simple majority in 27 years.
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Limited Exercise of Collective Self-Defense Is Not Unconstitutional

The deputy chief of Komeito, the LDP’s partner in the ruling coalition, argues that in today’s world it is not possible to seek peace for Japan alone. Kitagawa Kazuo explains that limited exercise of the right of collective self-defense is necessary and does not violate the Japanese Constitution.
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The Rightful Role of the House of CouncillorsOyama Reiko

The House of Councillors, Japan’s parliamentary upper house, was once seen as a mere rubber-stamping body. But since 1989 it has been a stronghold for whatever parties are out of power, and as such has managed to stifle ruling-party legislation. Is there a way for Japan to overcome this dysfunctional situation?
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Lower House Election Provides Little Drama as LDP Stays in Power

The forty-seventh House of Representatives election on December 14, 2014, saw the ruling coalition of the Liberal Democratic Party and Kōmeitō retain their two-thirds majority in the lower house by combining to capture 326 seats, an unchanged number. The much-expected gains of the LDP failed to materialize as the party lost four seats, slipping from 295 to 291. Coalition partner Kōmeitō managed to…
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Kōmeitō Turns Fifty: A History of Political Twists and CompromisesHarano Jōji

The Kōmeitō has spent the last 15 years in partnership with the Liberal Democratic Party. Taking the occasion of the party’s semicentennial, we look back on its checkered history and the challenges it now faces.
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Abe’s Moves Toward Collective Self-Defense

On July 1, 2014, Prime Minister Abe Shinzō’s cabinet adopted a resolution to reinterpret the Constitution to allow Japan to exercise the right to collective self-defense. What does this reinterpretation entail, and what are the security ramifications?
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Abe Shinzō’s Second Cabinet (December 2012)

After the general election of December 16, 2012, the Liberal Democratic Party and New Kōmeitō wrested power back from the Democratic Party of Japan. On December 26, Prime Minister Abe Shinzō announced the lineup of his second cabinet.
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