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Ceremony in Japan Commemorates Pearl Harbor Attack Victims (News)

Nagaoka, Niigata Pref., Dec. 8 (Jiji Press)—Memorial fireworks were launched in Nagaoka, Niigata Prefecture, on Thursday for those who died in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, marking the 75th anniversary of the incident. Viewers who gathered on a bank of the Shinano River also prayed for peace. Nagaoka is the hometown of Yamamoto Isoroku, commander-in-chief of the defunct Imperial Japanese…
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Honolulu and Nagaoka: Two Cities Linked by Wartime Legacies (Part II)

Honolulu, Hawaii, and Nagaoka, Niigata will join hands in commemorating the seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II this August 15 (August 14 in Hawaii). A display of Nagaoka’s famed fireworks at Pearl Harbor will reaffirm US-Japanese friendship, underscore the virtues of peace, and honor the memory of the war’s victims. Honolulu and Nagaoka: Two Cities Linked by Wartime Leg…
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Honolulu and Nagaoka: Two Cities Linked by Wartime Legacies (Part I)

Events to mark the seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II this August 15 (August 14 in Hawaii) will include a joint commemoration by Honolulu and Nagaoka. Sister cities since 2012, these Hawaii and Niigata municipalities share painful memories of the war. Honolulu was the site, of course, of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 (December 8 in Japan), that inaugurated …
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When Will the “Postwar” End? Japanese Youth in Search of a FutureFuruichi Noritoshi

Japanese teenagers and young adults are remarkably content with their lives, in spite—or perhaps because—of the uncertain future they face. Sociologist Furuichi Noritoshi makes the case that the nation has betrayed its young people by artificially extending the “postwar” economy instead of adapting to the realities of a post-postwar world.
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Divided Memories: History Textbooks and the Wars in AsiaDaniel Sneider

Some common assumptions about history textbooks used in Japan turn out to be ill-founded. Far from inculcating patriotism, as many overseas observers assume, Japanese high school textbooks tend to dryly present a chronology of historical facts, with little interpretive narrative added. This is the finding of the Divided Memories and Reconciliation project by the author and his colleague Professor Gi-Wook Shin, involving an in-depth comparison of history textbooks used in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the United States.
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