Home > Hot topics
PKO
A Quarter-Century of Developments in National Security Legislation

Japan’s national defense policy has evolved as a cumulative response to world events since the end of the Cold War. It has gained new aspects through a series of conflicts, crises, and terrorist acts, including the Gulf War of 1991, the first North Korean nuclear crisis of 1993, the 9/11 terrorist attacks of 2001, the counterterror military action in Afghanistan, and the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
(More)

The Opposition Stance on Security Policy

Nagashima Akihisa, an expert on security issues from the Democratic Party of Japan, explains that while the top opposition party cannot go along with the security legislation proposed by the Abe administration, it does not totally reject the idea of exercising the right of collective self-defense.
(More)

The Illusion of “Rising Nationalism”: Internationalism and Xenophobia in Today’s JapanKarube Tadashi

Both in Japan and overseas, journalists have been expressing concern about the rise of nationalism under Prime Minister Abe Shinzō. A political scientist questions the validity of these worries.
(More)

Bringing “Internationalism” BackHosoya Yuichi

In May 2014 the Advisory Panel on Reconstruction of the Legal Basis for Security presented its final report to the prime minister. Panel member Hosoya discusses the issues this panel addressed, including the constitutionality of collective self-defense.
(More)

The Turnabout of Japan’s Security Policy: Toward “Proactive Pacifism”Kitaoka Shin’ichi

At the end of 2013 the establishment of the National Security Council, the formulation of a National Security Strategy, and other moves shed light on new developments in Japan’s security policy. Kitaoka Shin’ichi, president of the International University of Japan, who played a leading role in the policy-making process for these measures, explains the trajectory of recent developments.
(More)

The Gulf War and Japanese DiplomacyNakanishi Hiroshi

More than 20 years have passed since the Gulf War, set off by the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. The first international crisis since the end of the Cold War rocked the Japanese government and brought the shortcomings of Japanese diplomacy painfully into the open. We look back on the “Gulf shock” and its lasting consequences for Japan’s foreign policy.
(More)

Video highlights

New series

バナーエリア2
  • From our columnists
  • In the news