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Forging Intergenerational Links in VietnamDoi Yoshinori

In Vietnam, which lacks an adequate social welfare system, informal community-based activities play a major role in the well-being of elderly residents. The Intergenerational Self-Help Club (ISHC) in Thanh Hóa province on Vietnam’s north central coast is one example.
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Buddhism’s Role in Social Welfare for Elderly Citizens in VietnamDoi Yoshinori

In Vietnam, which lacks an adequate social welfare system, Mahayana Buddhist institutions play a key role in securing the welfare of elderly residents. At a temple in the old central Vietnamese capital of Hue, these residents live in peace and comfort with the support of Buddhist nuns.
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Creating Caregivers: Hill Tribes Fill Lowlands Care GapAsada Rei

Compared to cities like Bangkok, Chiang Mai in Thailand’s north offers cooler weather and an easier way of life that attracts not only tourists but also permanent residents from overseas. The tranquil, picturesque city is home to more than a hundred Buddhist temples, as well as the Old City with its ancient walls, and is surrounded by lushly forested hills and mountains, including Doi Inthanon, Thailand’s highest peak. In this installment, we look at efforts in this region to make life easier for older residents.
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Recognizing What You Have: Lessons from Elder Care in ThailandAsada Rei

The aging of society in Thailand outstrips that in all other ASEAN countries. Thai government policy identifies “family and community” as core providers of care, a stance reflecting cultural and social traditions. But how do the people of Thailand approach care for older citizens in day-to-day life? This is the first installment of a two-part report on observations from fieldwork in Thailand.
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NGO Support for Elderly Health, Independence in the PhilippinesKashiwagi Shiho

The Philippine population, which now exceeds 100 million, has already begun to gray. National and local governments are making progress on support for older residents, but volunteers and NGOs are increasingly expected to fill the gaps left by insufficient funding and other difficulties.
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Filipino Hospitality and Respect for the AgedKashiwagi Shiho

In the Philippines, like other Southeast Asian countries, caring for older people falls mostly to family members, but private organizations step in to help older people who live alone or are in difficult financial situations. This warm and human response to genuine need also reflects the Filipino tradition of respect for one’s elders.
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The Wolgye Social Welfare Center’s “Beautiful Neighbors” ProgramKim Sung-won

In South Korea, the late 1980s saw the beginning of a trend toward supporting the social welfare of communities by establishing local centers for that purpose. The Wolgye Social Welfare Center in Nowon, Seoul, is one such facility. The success of its “Beautiful Neighbors” program, in which people contribute to social welfare by donating goods and services that local residents need, has made it a model for similar programs around the country.
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A Place for Older Koreans: Memories PlusKim Sung-won

Jongno, Seoul, is home to a rich array of support services for the senior citizens who gather there. One such establishment is Memories Plus, which, with support from the private sector, offers patrons inexpensive refreshments and a place to relax. The success Memories Plus has found encouraging interaction between its patrons and creating employment for older residents is attracting attention.
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As Regions Age, Shopping Centers Strive to AdaptKawamura Keitarō

“Shuttered shopping districts” are on the rise across Japan as aged storekeepers with no successors are forced to close down instead. The city of Shūnan in Yamaguchi Prefecture has managed to rebuild its community and revitalize its shopping district by supporting new stores opened by returnees and new arrivals to the city.
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Fomenting Filial Piety amid Changing Lifestyles in ChinaWan Yi

Gathering to celebrate the Spring Festival (lunar new year) and other celebrations as a family is a longstanding Chinese tradition, but an increasing number of people in major cities do not go home for the holidays at all. The Chinese Law on Protection of the Rights and Interest of the Elderly aims to halt this trend and promote filial piety by making regular visits to parents a legal obligation, but will this strategy succeed?
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