International Relations and the Earthquake Disaster Archive

  • Taniguchi Tomohiko, former Foreign Ministry deputy press secretary, finds the nickname “Teflon Kan” appropriate for Prime Minister Kan Naoto in light of his survival of a no-confidence measure to hold on to power. Although Kan’s political maneuvers may have won him more time, Japan is losing out under his inept leadership.

    “Teflon Kan” Survives, but Will Japan?

    Taniguchi Tomohiko, former Foreign Ministry deputy press secretary, finds the nickname “Teflon Kan” appropriate for Prime Minister Kan Naoto in light of his survival of a no-confidence measure to hold on to power. Although Kan’s political maneuvers may have won him more time, Japan is losing out under his inept leadership.

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  • As Japan emerged from the misery of the immediate postwar period, Arnold Toynbee’s view that civilizations advance only by responding to challenge was widely popular in Japan. Taniguchi Tomohiko, former Foreign Ministry deputy press secretary, argues that today’s Japan faces a “Toynbee moment” that requires nothing short of national transformation.

    Japan’s “Toynbee Moment”

    As Japan emerged from the misery of the immediate postwar period, Arnold Toynbee’s view that civilizations advance only by responding to challenge was widely popular in Japan. Taniguchi Tomohiko, former Foreign Ministry deputy press secretary, argues that today’s Japan faces a “Toynbee moment” that requires nothing short of national transformation.

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  • Taniguchi Tomohiko, former deputy press secretary at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, discusses the international respect for Japan after the disaster that claimed so many lives and laments the laggardly response of a Japanese government that seems content to allow this esteem to go to waste.

    The JET “Martyrs” and the Japanese Government

    Taniguchi Tomohiko, former deputy press secretary at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, discusses the international respect for Japan after the disaster that claimed so many lives and laments the laggardly response of a Japanese government that seems content to allow this esteem to go to waste.

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