Kishida Unlikely to Express Remorse over War at U.S. Congress

Politics

Tokyo, April 3 (Jiji Press)--Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is unlikely to express remorse over World War II in a speech at the U.S. Congress on April 11, Japanese government officials said Wednesday.

The issue of Japan's position on the war "has been settled to some extent" and Kishida "will not touch on it in the speech," a senior Japanese Foreign Ministry official said. The speech will be "future-oriented," an aide to Kishida said.

Kishida will be the first Japanese prime minister to deliver a speech at a joint session of the U.S. Congress since Shinzo Abe did in April 2015.

In his 2015 speech on the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, Abe said, "We started out on our path bearing in mind feelings of deep remorse over the war."

Kishida will give his speech in English. He will state that Japan and the United States are partners in maintaining and strengthening the free and open international order based on the rule of law.

[Copyright The Jiji Press, Ltd.]

Jiji Press