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3/11
Work to Store Tainted Soil at Fukushima Facility Begins (News)

Fukushima (Jiji Press)—Japan's Environment Ministry started bringing tainted soil into one of the interim storage facilities for radioactive waste in Fukushima Prefecture on October 28. Work teams carry contaminated soil into the interim storage facility via covered conveyor belt on October 20, 2017, in Ōkuma, Fukushima. (© Jiji) Soil generated from work to decontaminate areas hit by fallou…
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Major Fukushima Beach Reopens After Seven Years (News)

Iwaki, Fukushima Pref., July 15 (Jiji Press)—Usuiso Beach in Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture, reopened Saturday to bathers for the first time in seven years. The last time the bathing area was open to beachgoers was in the summer of 2010, before the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent nuclear accident. High-schoolers test the waters in Iwaki, Fukushima, after performing a hula dan…
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Major Construction, Quiet Developments Will Change Tōhoku IslandRobert D. Eldridge

On a beautiful but chilly morning at the end of March 2017, a major engineering project was taking place in northeastern Miyagi Prefecture. But despite the ambitious scale of this operation, it attracted little national or international attention. The site was the Ōshima Strait, separating the island of Ōshima and a peninsula leading out from the city of Kesennuma on the mainland. Workers were …
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Japan Minister to Resign over March 2011 Disaster Gaffe (News)

Tokyo, April 25 (Jiji Press)—Japanese postdisaster reconstruction minister Imamura Masahiro decided Tuesday to resign to take responsibility for a gaffe he made the same day over the March 2011 massive earthquake and tsunami that mainly hit the Tōhoku northeastern region of the country. His resignation would effectively be a dismissal by Prime Minister Abe Shinzō, who is trying to minimize the …
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What Tōhoku Can Teach Harvard Business School StudentsYamazaki Mayuka

Every year since 2012, students from Harvard Business School have been traveling to the disaster areas of Tōhoku. What do the students learn there and what can they do in return for the people of Tōhoku? Here, one of the organizers talks about what she learned from the program.
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Japan Bill Eyes Reconstruction Footholds in Fukushima (News)

Tokyo, Feb. 10 (Jiji Press)—The Japanese government at a cabinet meeting on Friday adopted a bill to set up reconstruction footholds in the no-go zone heavily contaminated by the March 2011 nuclear accident in Fukushima Prefecture. The bill would give priority to decontamination work and infrastructure development at the footholds, with costs shouldered by the central government. The government…
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One Man and His Cats in Fukushima (Photos)Ota Yasusuke (Photographs)

Matsumura Naoto has been looking after all kinds of abandoned animals in Fukushima since residents evacuated following the disaster of March 11, 2011. In 2013, he adopted two kittens that have become his constant companions. Photographer Ota Yasusuke captures their everyday antics in a series of lively images.
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Timeline for March 2016

A court order forces Takahama Nuclear Power Station to halt operations, the Hokkaidō Shinkansen service starts, and the nation marks five years since the Great East Japan Earthquake. Here are the major news stories of March 2016.
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Disaster and the Japanese SpiritAlexander N. Meshcheryakov

The Japanese archipelago is located in a zone of high seismic activity, and there are numerous records of earthquakes over the country's history. In classical Japanese literature, however, earthquakes are almost entirely absent. Why is this? There are two main reasons. First, earthquakes are primarily urban disasters. Most earthquake victims are city dwellers who are killed either by fires or…
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Telling the Story of FukushimaWinifred Bird

Five years after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami touched off a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the disaster is no longer just a current event—it is also a part of Japan’s history. But how should that history be told? Government and civil society groups have different answers, and they are starting to emerge in a battle of museums.
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