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Job-Hunting Season Kicks Off in Japan (News)

Tokyo, March 1 (Jiji Press)—University and other students in Japan who are due to graduate in spring 2018 kicked off job-hunting activities on Wednesday, when companies were allowed to start offering seminars to provide information about them, including their business operations, for the upcoming graduates. The job-hunting season is expected to last effectively for only some three months, with …
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Toshiba in Crisis After Failed Nuclear GambleMori Kazuo

Toshiba is in profound difficulties, facing enormous losses from its nuclear subsidiary and forced to sell off its profitable flash memory business. Journalist Mori Kazuo traces the path from President Nishida Atsutoshi’s 2005 gamble to pull the company out of stagnation up to its present troubles.
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Toshiba Reports Larger April–December Loss (News)

Tokyo, Feb. 14 (Jiji Press)—Toshiba Corp. reported Tuesday a group net loss of ¥499.9 billion for April–December 2016, even larger than the year-before loss of ¥479.4 billion, due to its US nuclear power plant business debacle. The company’s auditors have not yet approved earnings for the nine-month period. The unapproved results indicate that the struggling Japanese electronics and machinery m…
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A Solution to the Global Water Shortage?

Every summer brings water shortages in Japan, and this has given rise to a host of water-saving products. One major hit in recent years has been the Bubble90 nozzle that can cut water use by 90% while also improving washing performance. It has been widely adopted in the restaurant industry.
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The “Analects” and the Abacus: The Contemporary Relevance of Shibusawa Eiichi’s Business PhilosophyTanaka Kazuhiro

Shibusawa Eiichi, the “father of Japanese capitalism,” saw morality as an essential part of economic activity and stressed pursuit of the public interest. His ideas are attracting renewed attention in a time of concern over excesses in global capitalism.
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A Venerable Family Business Built on Tea and PaperKikuchi Masanori

The Ejima family has been selling Japanese paper and green tea in the castle town of Odawara, outside Tokyo, for over three centuries. During that time the retailers have bounced back from adversity on several occasions, emerging each time stronger than before.
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Nippon Kōdō: Bringing Japan’s Incense Traditions to the WorldKikuchi Masanori

Incense arrived in Japan together with Buddhism in the sixth century. The first professional incense masters were working in the sixteenth century, and incense in Japan has followed a distinctive path from religious ceremonies to connoisseurship and simple enjoyment. Today the country’s biggest incense maker is using an array of new services to increase its international appeal and ensure a brighter, more global future for Japanese incense.
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Fostering a New Generation of Women Leaders

Japan recently brought into force a new law aimed at closing the gender gap in the nation’s workforce by bringing more women into mid- and upper-management positions. To prepare women for civic and private leadership roles, a program run in cooperation with the US-Japan Council and other partners provides young female college students unique opportunities to learn from prominent leaders in both Japan and the United States.
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Changing Career Goals for Female Students in JapanUehara Yoshiko

To follow up on my previous article about shūkatsu, Japanese students’ hunt for post-graduation jobs, in which I discussed this annual ritual in the context of the changes in Japanese society, here I would like to offer an overview of the job hunt for women students. The current generation of older people may still harbor an image of the students at women’s universities as taking jobs with top-…
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“Shūkatsu”: How Japanese Students Hunt for JobsUehara Yoshiko

Foreign tourists are now an everyday sight on the streets of Tokyo. One wonders what they make of the young Japanese men and women they see wearing uniform black suits, showing less individuality than even the typical “salaryman.” They are evidently not businesspeople, but what are they? The answer: These are Japanese university students suited up to hunt for post-graduation jobs. A distinctive…
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