Japan Data

Coronavirus Cases in Japan by Prefecture

Society

Of the 485 new cases nationwide on September 27, there are 144 in Tokyo.

Cases in Japan: 81,690 Infections, 1,545 Deaths (as of 12:00 on September 27, 2020)

Infected in Japan 80,747
Returnees from China on government charter flights 15
Cases confirmed in airport screening 922
Total 81,690
Deaths 1,545
Recoveries 74,607

Created by Nippon.com based on data from the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare.

Cases Reported by Local Governments: 81,199 Infections, 1,558 Deaths (as of September 27, 2020)

Prefecture Infections (new on 9/27) Deaths
Hokkaidō 2,058 (+20) 107
Aomori 35 1
Iwate 23
Miyagi 392 (+3) 2
Akita 53  
Yamagata 78 1
Fukushima 247 (+5) 2
Ibaraki 638 (+1) 17
Tochigi 427 1
Gunma 699 (+1) 19
Saitama 4,582 (+35) 101
Chiba 3,805 (+21) 70
Tokyo 25,257(+144) 411
Kanagawa 6,744 (+65) 136
Niigata 170  
Toyama 412 25
Ishikawa 776 (+3) 47
Fukui 244 11
Yamanashi 182 (+1) 6
Nagano 305 (+2) 1
Gifu 616 10
Shizuoka 532 (+2) 2
Aichi 5,303 (+49) 83
Mie 495 (+1) 5
Shiga 495 (+5) 8
Kyoto 1,731 (+5) 25
Osaka 10,447 (+48) 201
Hyōgo 2,674 (+16) 59
Nara 547 9
Wakayama 240 (+2) 4
Tottori 36  
Shimane 140  
Okayama 153 (+1) 1
Hiroshima 532 (+16) 3
Yamaguchi 198 (+2) 2
Tokushima 147 9
Kagawa 94
Ehime 114 6
Kōchi 138 (+1) 4
Fukuoka 5,027 (+4) 95
Saga 245  
Nagasaki 236  3
Kumamoto 572 8
Ōita 158 2
Miyazaki 364
Kagoshima 411 (+6) 12
Okinawa 2,427 (+20) 46

Created by Nippon.com based on data from local governments. Prefectures are listed in the standard Japanese geographical order, from north to south. In some cases, local standards vary from those of the MHLW, so the total may not match the MHLW statistics.

Cruise Ship Passenger Fatalities: 13

Click here for information on infections by country and news updates.

September 27

Of the 485 new cases nationwide, 144 are in Tokyo.

September 26

A total of 643 new cases are reported across the country, of which 270 are in Tokyo and 91 in Kanagawa.

September 25

Japan reports 576 new cases, including 195 for a second day in Tokyo, 79 in Kanagawa, and 62 in Osaka.

September 24

There are 483 new cases nationwide. With the end of the four-day weekend, the total increases along with the number of tests. Tokyo rises above 100 again, reporting 195 new cases.

September 23

Japan reports 219 new cases, including 59 in Tokyo. This is the first time for Tokyo to have fewer than 60 cases since June 30, although this is affected by reduced testing during the four-day weekend.

September 22

A total of 330 new cases are reported nationwide, with 88 in Tokyo. These low numbers are likely impacted by the testing having taken place during the preceding four-day weekend. 

September 21

Japan reports 312 new cases, of which 98, or almost 30%, are in Tokyo. The daily nationwide total has now remained below 1,000 for one month.

September 20

There are 480 new cases in Japan, including 162 in Tokyo, 60 in Kanagawa, and 59 in Osaka.

September 19

Of the 601 new cases across the country, 218 are in Tokyo and 81 in Osaka.

September 18

There are 574 new cases nationwide, including 220 in Tokyo, 78 in Kanagawa, 40 in Chiba, and 24 in Saitama. While Tokyo has dropped from its August peak, there is no end in sight.

September 17

A total of 492 new cases are reported across the country. The daily total of 171 in Tokyo drops by more than 100 from the 276 cases reported on the previous Thursday, September 10.

September 16

Japan reports 548 new cases. Tokyo’s 163 cases bring its overall total to 23,437. Kanagawa has 101 new cases and Osaka 78.

September 15

There are 530 new cases across the country. Of these, 191 are in Tokyo, which enjoyed a sub-100 total the day before.

September 14

The nationwide daily total of 269 new cases includes 80 in Tokyo.

September 13

Of the 439 new cases reported across Japan, 146 are in Tokyo.

September 12

Japan reports 648 new cases, of which 226 are in Tokyo.

September 11

There are 644 new cases nationwide, including 187 in Tokyo, 120 in Osaka, and a record high for Miyagi of 15.

September 10

Japan reports 711 new cases, of which 276 are in Tokyo, 112 in Kanagawa, and 92 in Osaka. Due to the general downward trend in Tokyo, the metropolitan government plans to lift its request for establishments  serving alcohol in the central 23 municipalities to shorten their opening hours from September 15. It will lift its request for residents to refrain from trips outside the metropolis on the same day.

September 9

There are 507 new cases nationwide for the day. Tokyo marks 149 and 106 new cases are confirmed in Kanagawa. 

September 8

Nationwide, the daily total of new cases hits 513; in Tokyo, the day’s number is 170.

September 7

Japan’s daily total of 294 new cases drops below 300 for the first time since July 13. This appears to have been influenced in part by decreased weekend testing; operations were further reduced in the west of the country due to the approach of Typhoon Haishen. Tokyo reports 77 cases.

September 6

The nationwide daily total of 450 new cases includes 116 in Tokyo.

September 5

Japan’s daily total of 599 new cases includes 181 in Tokyo, 76 in Osaka, and 67 in Kanagawa.

September 4

The nationwide daily total of 588 new cases includes 136 in Tokyo, 108 in Kanagawa, and 74 in Osaka. It is now two weeks since the daily total last topped 1,000 cases.

September 3

Japan’s daily total of 658 new cases includes 211 in Tokyo.

The Nikkei index rises 218.38 to finish the day at 23,465.53, returning to a prepandemic level.

September 2

The nationwide daily total of 594 new cases includes 141 in Tokyo.

September 1

Japan’s daily total of 630 new cases includes 170 in Tokyo and 114 in Osaka. A cluster at a medical facility leads to Ishikawa recording its highest ever prefectural daily total of 27.

August 31

Japan marks a daily total of 435 new cases nationwide, including an even 100 in Tokyo.

August 30

The nationwide daily total of 599 new cases includes 148 in Tokyo.

August 29

The nationwide daily total of 845 new cases includes 247 in Tokyo, 106 in Kanagawa, and 90 in Osaka.

August 28

The nationwide daily total of 880 new cases includes 226 in Tokyo, 106 in Osaka, and 75 in Kanagawa.

August 27

Tokyo reports 250 new cases, bringing its overall total above 20,000 to 20,096. It topped 5,000 on May 11 and 10,000 on July 22. The nationwide total for the day is 863.

Tokyo extends its request for karaoke parlors and establishments serving alcohol to close by 10:00 at night, although it limits the call to the central 23 municipalities. The request, which was previously scheduled from August 3 to 31, now runs until September 15.

August 26

The nationwide daily total of 898 new cases includes 236 in Tokyo. A Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare working group agrees to call on seniors, medical personnel, and other high-priority groups to get vaccinated early for influenza ahead of the winter season.

August 25

The nationwide daily total of 717 new cases includes 182 in Tokyo. At a press conference, Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Hagiuda Kōichi calls on Japanese children to show consideration for others who are infected or have symptoms.

August 24

The nationwide daily total of 493 new cases includes 95 in Tokyo and 60 in Osaka. It drops below 500 for the first time since July 20.

August 23

The nationwide daily total of 745 new cases includes 212 in Tokyo.

August 22

The nationwide daily total of 982 new cases includes 256 in Tokyo.

August 21

The nationwide daily total of 1,034 new cases includes 258 in Tokyo, 166 in Osaka, and 87 in Fukuoka. A government panel of experts suggests that the present wave of infections may have reached its peak from July 27 to 29. 

August 20

The nationwide daily total of 1,183 new cases includes 339 in Tokyo. With the addition of cases confirmed in airport screenings and cruise ship passengers, Japan’s overall total is now 60,000. It took around three months to reach 10,000 from the first confirmed case on January 16. This month, the total passed 40,000 on August 4 and 50,000 on August 10.

August 19

The nationwide daily total of 1,065 new cases includes 187 in Osaka, outstripping the 186 in Tokyo, 103 in Fukuoka, and 95 in Kanagawa. 

August 18

The nationwide daily total of 917 new cases includes 207 in Tokyo, 185 in Osaka, and 84 in Kanagawa. There are 16 fatalities across the country, including 6 in Osaka, and 3 each in Tokyo and Fukuoka, which is the highest daily total since the national state of emergency was lifted.

August 17

The nationwide daily total of 641 new cases includes 161 in Tokyo. The relatively low total is affected by reduced testing during the final weekend of the Obon holiday season. In a speech, Tokyo Governor Koike Yuriko notes the tendency for lower figures on Monday, and calls on residents to remain vigilant.

Japan’s GDP for the second quarter of 2020 drops by 27.8% on an annualized basis, the largest decrease on record. Calls to refrain from going outside during the state of emergency contributed to an 8.2% drop in personal consumption, which accounts for more than half of GDP. Plummeting global demand also led to an 18.5% drop in exports.

August 16

The nationwide daily total of 1,021 new cases includes 260 in Tokyo, although the lower number is thought to have been affected by reduced testing during the Obon holiday season. A cluster among members of the rugby team at Tenri University, Nara Prefecture, has  infected 20 people to date.

August 15

Tokyo reports 385 new cases, bringing its overall total to 17,454. Kanagawa reports a record high 136 new cases.

August 14

The nationwide daily total of 1,359 new cases includes 389 in Tokyo, 192 in Osaka, and 117 in Kanagawa.

August 13

The nationwide daily total of 1,177 new cases includes 206 in Tokyo, 177 in Osaka, 144 in Fukuoka, and 123 in Kanagawa.

August 12

The nationwide daily total of 972 new cases includes 222 in Tokyo, 184 in Osaka, 86 in Aichi, and 77 in Fukuoka.

August 11

The nationwide daily total of 702 new cases includes 188 in Tokyo. The relatively low total is affected by reduced testing over the long weekend.

August 10

The nationwide daily total of 837 new cases includes 197 in Tokyo, 123 in Osaka, and 72 in Fukuoka. The relatively low total is affected by reduced testing over the long weekend.

August 9

The nationwide daily total of 1,441 new cases includes 331 in Tokyo, 195 in Osaka, 129 in Aichi, and 109 in Fukuoka. Okinawa reports a record 159 new cases.

A major cluster emerges in Matsue, Shimane Prefecture, as 86 students and 2 teachers connected to a high school soccer club are found to be infected.

Prime Minister Abe Shinzō says that every necessary measure should be taken to avoid declaring another state of emergency, considering the effect it would have on employment and daily lives.

August 8

The nationwide daily total of 1,563 new cases includes 429 in Tokyo and record figures in Kanagawa (129) and Saitama (84).

August 7

The nationwide daily total of 1,600 new cases is  the highest to date.  Tokyo reports 462 new cases, bringing its overall total to 15,107, and there are record figures in Osaka (255) and Okinawa (100).

August 6

The nationwide daily total of 1,472 new cases includes 360 in Tokyo and record figures in Osaka (225), Kanagawa (119), and Chiba (76).

Tokyo Governor Koike calls on residents to refrain from travel outside the metropolis during the Obon holiday period.

Aichi Prefecture declares its own state of emergency from August 6 to 24. Residents are asked to refrain from making unnecessary trips across prefectural borders and having meals or parties in groups of five or more. Governor Ōmura Hideaki says people should think seriously before making decisions on meeting relatives during the Obon holidays.

August 5

The nationwide daily total of 1,356 new cases includes 263 in Tokyo.

Fukuoka issues a prefectural alert, calling on medical facilities to secure beds due to the rapid increase in patients. From August 8 to 21, customers are asked to limit visits to establishments offering settai services or serving alcohol to a maximum of two hours each time.

August 4

The nationwide daily total of 1,230 new cases includes 309 in Tokyo and record figures in Kanagawa (89) and Okinawa (83).

August 3

The nationwide daily total of 960 falls below 1,000 for the first time in six days,. However, the figure was reduced somewhat by the lower level of weekend testing. Tokyo reports 258 new cases.

August 2

The nationwide daily total of 1,332 new cases includes 292 in Tokyo, 194 in Osaka, and 160 in Aichi. There are also high totals per capita in some less urbanized prefectures, including 64 in Okinawa, 60 in Miyazaki, and 23 in Nagasaki.

August 1

The nationwide daily total of 1,534 new cases tops 1,000 for the fourth successive day. Tokyo reports a record total of 472, while there are also many cases in other heavily urbanized districts like Osaka, Aichi, and Fukuoka.

The Aichi prefectural government requests karaoke parlors and establishments offering settai services or serving alcohol in Nagoya entertainment districts to shorten operating hours until 8:00 in the evening. It says it will pay ¥10,000 each day to establishments that cooperate during the period from August 5 to 24.

July 31

The nationwide daily total sets a new record of 1,570. Tokyo reports 463 new cases, topping 400 for the first time and setting a record for the daily total, while Osaka reports 216, Aichi 193, and Fukuoka 170.

The Osaka prefectural government issues business suspension requests to establishments with settai services and karaoke parlors not displaying stickers to show they have introduced measures to prevent infection in the Minami district of the city of Osaka. The requests will last from August 6 to 20. It also asks other such establishments that do display stickers, as well as ordinary bars and restaurants in the district, to shorten operating hours and close at 8:00 in the evening.

July 30

The nationwide daily total sets a new record of 1,305, including Tokyo’s highest total to date of 367 new cases. Governor Koike says that the metropolis may have to declare its own state of emergency and calls on karaoke parlors and establishments serving alochol to close by 10:00 at night from August 3 to 31.

July 29

The nationwide daily total of 1,260 new cases rises above 1,000 for the first time, including 250 in Tokyo, 221 in Osaka, 167 in Aichi, 101 in Fukuoka, and 70 in Kanagawa. The first two cases are also reported in Iwate, which had been the last prefecture yet to report any infections.

July 28

Tokyo reports 266 new cases, bringing its overall total to 11,611. Several prefectures report record highs, including Osaka (155), Aichi (109), Kyoto (31), Gifu (25), and Okinawa (21), contributing to a nationwide total of 981, which equals the record set on July 23.

July 27

Tokyo reports 131 new cases, bringing its overall total to 11,345. This is the first time for the daily figure to drop below 200 in a week, but it was affected by reduced testing. The metropolis has reported over 5,000 new cases since the start of July.

July 26

Tokyo reports 239 new cases for a sixth successive daily figure over 200, bringing its overall total to 11,214. Osaka reports 141, Fukuoka 90, and Aichi 80, contributing to a nationwide total of 828. Including cases confirmed in airport screening, this brings Japan’s total to more than 30,000, a number that will be reflected in the official figures announced as of noon on July 27.  It is less than three weeks since the national total rose above 20,000 on July 7.

July 25

Tokyo reports 295 new cases for a fifth successive daily figure over 200, bringing its overall total to 10,975. Osaka reports 132 and Aichi 78, contributing to a nationwide total of 807.

July 24

Tokyo reports 260 new cases for a fourth successive daily figure over 200, bringing its overall total to 10,680. Osaka reports 149, Aichi 63, Fukuoka 52, and Saitama 45 contributing to a nationwide total of 777.

Prime Minister Abe calls on the public to take full precautions against infection, saying that it is not a situation for declaring another state of emergency.

The island of Yoronjima in Kagoshima Prefecture reports 23 cases from July 22 to 24. Most of the patients are transported for treatment off the island, which has a population of just 5,200, including a high proportion of seniors, and limited medical resources.

July 23

The nationwide daily total of 981 cases sets a new record, considerably higher than the previous record of 795 cases the day before.

Tokyo reports 366 new cases, setting a new record for the daily total. The day’s number of new confirmed cases is more than 70 higher than the previous record of 293 on July 17. Tokyo Metropolitan Government officials note that some 60% of the new cases were found in people in their twenties and thirties. Osaka reports more than 100 new cases for the second successive day, while Aichi reports 97, Fukuoka 66, and Saitama 64.

July 22

The nationwide daily total of 795 cases sets a new record, topping the 743 cases on April 11.

Tokyo reports 238 new cases, bringing its overall total to 10,054. Of these, some 3,800, or more than one third, have been reported in July. Osaka reports 121 new cases, its highest daily total to date. Aichi and Saitama also report record highs of 64 and 62 new cases, respectively.

July 21

There have now been over 1,000 COVID-19 fatalities in Japan, including deaths of cruise ship passengers.

Tokyo Governor Koike says she will ask residents not to make unnecessary trips out of the home during the four-day weekend starting on July 23, and that this is especially important for the elderly and people with preexisting conditions.

Tokyo reports 237 new cases, bringing its overall total to 9,816. The metropolis has reported three-digit figures every day this month except July 1 and 8.

July 20

Tokyo reports 168 new cases for a second consecutive daily total under 200, bringing its overall number of cases to 9,579.

July 19

Tokyo reports 188 new cases, as its daily total drops below 200 for the first time in four days. Osaka, however, reports 89 new cases, its highest daily total since the state of emergency was lifted.

July 18

Tokyo reports 290 new cases for a third successive daily total over 200, bringing its overall number of cases to 9,223. Kantō and Kansai both report high numbers of cases, the latter including 86 in Osaka and 25 in Kyoto, and the national total of 662 is the highest since the state of emergency was lifted.

July 17

Tokyo reports 293 new cases, setting a record for the second successive day, and bringing its overall total to 8,933. The metropolitan government attributes the high total in part to having conducted more than 4,000 PCR tests. The nationwide total is 593, including 53 in Osaka, 51 in Saitama, and 43 in Kanagawa.

July 16

The nationwide daily total of 623 cases is the third highest to date, approaching the peak figure recorded in April. In the eighth straight day of three-digit totals for new cases in the capital, Tokyo reports a record high 286 cases. In other prefectures, there are the highest totals recorded since the state of emergency in Osaka (66), Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba. The national government responds by deciding to exclude journeys to and from Tokyo from its “Go To Travel” tourism promotion campaign.

July 15

Tokyo Governor Koike says that the central government should rethink its Go To Travel campaign to boost domestic tourism, and either suspend it or limit it to areas other than Japan’s urban centers. She calls on residents not to make unnecessary trips outside the metropolis. Osaka Governor Yoshimura Hirofumi similarly expresses opposition to rapidly opening up the country, saying that the Kantō and Kansai areas should be excluded. The Japan Medical Association also makes a statement criticizing the campaign.

Tokyo reports 165 new cases, for a seventh successive daily total over 100. The metropolis raises its COVID-19 alert to its highest level from “infections are starting to spread” to “infections are spreading.” Governor Koike says that it is time to warn residents, and calls for cooperation in containing the disease.

July 14

Tokyo reports 143 new cases, for a sixth successive daily total over 100. As well as clubs in Shinjuku and Ikebukuro, clusters have been found at nurseries and a theater.

Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura Yasutoshi indicated that the government is considering issuing business suspension requests to host and cabaret clubs offering settai services that are not complying with guidelines to prevent the spread of COVID-19. He also called on customers not to patronize such establishments.

July 13

Tokyo reports 119 new cases, as the daily total drops below 200 for the first time since July 8.

A public health nurse dispatched to Kumamoto Prefecture to assist with disaster relief efforts is found to be infected with COVID-19. The nurse from Takamatsu, Kagawa Prefecture, assisted at shelters for four days from July 8.

July 12

Tokyo reports 206 new cases for the second straight day. It is the fourth day in a row for new cases to break the 200 mark; the Tokyo metropolis’s total rises to nearly 8,000 cases since the pandemic began. 

July 11

The Futenma Air Station and Camp Hansen, two US Marine Corps installations on Okinawa, report a total of 61 cases detected since July 7. Many US military personnel took part in US Independence Day celebrations at off-base locations on or around July 4, raising concerns of fresh clusters also affecting Japanese residents in those areas. 

An additional 206 cases are reported in Tokyo, marking the third straight day for the number of new cases to go above 200. 

July 10

Tokyo reports 243 new cases, its highest daily total to date.

Restrictions are eased, increasing the maximum number of people allowed to gather at events like concerts and exhibitions from 1,000 to 5,000. This will also apply to professional sports matches. However, venues should not exceed 50% capacity.

Tokyo had its highest daily total to date on July 9 of 224 new cases, with signs of an upward trend in other urban areas. Even so, the government has continued with easing of restrictions, maintaining that it is not the time to declare another state of emergency on the basis that there have been few serious cases to put pressure on the medical system.

July 9

Tokyo reports 224 new cases, its highest daily total to date, topping the previous record of 206 on April 17. In May, the daily total steadily dropped to remain below 50, and even reached single figures. Since the state of emergency was lifted, however, it has steadily risen again. From July 2 to 7, there were more than 100 new cases each day. The new cases on July 9 reportedly include those identified through group testing of host clubs.

July 7

Tokyo reports 106 new cases, bringing its overall total to 6,973. More than 200 new cases are reported nationwide, including 27 in Saitama, 11 in Chiba, 8 in Kanagawa, and 8 in Kagoshima. The day’s cases bring Japan’s total to more than 20,000, a number that will be reflefcted in the official figures announced as of noon on July 8. 

July 6

Tokyo reports 102 new cases, bringing its overall total to 6,867. It is the fifth consecutive day of more than 100 new cases in the capital.

July 5

Tokyo reports 111 new cases, bringing its overall total to 6,765. Kanagawa and Saitama Prefectures each report more than 20 new cases, while Kagoshima reports 13. The total cases reported nationwide rise above 200 for a third successive day.

July 4

Tokyo reports 131 new cases, bringing its overall total to 6,654. Kagoshima Prefecture reports 34 new cases, of which 30 are connected to the same nightlife establishment.

July 3

Tokyo reports 124 new cases, bringing its overall total to 6,523. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government calls for people to avoid nightlife districts. Kagoshima Prefecture reports 30 new cases, of which 28 are connected to the same nightlife establishment.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Suga Yoshihide says that around 70% of the more than 100 new cases in Tokyo are among people in their twenties and thirties, and that as serious cases are decreasing, it is not the time to declare another state of emergency.

July 2

Tokyo reports 107 new cases, with the daily total rising above 100 for the first time since May 2. The number of daily cases decreased steadily through May, but started rising again in mid-June. Governor Koike calls for vigilance and for people to avoid nightlife districts. In Kagoshima Prefecture, there were nine new cases, including eight staff members at an establishment offering settai services. There were also new cases in prefectures like Tottori and Okayama, which had seen relatively low figures to date.

July 1

Tokyo reports 67 new cases, its highest daily total since the state of emergency was lifted. The average daily total over the past 7-day period rises to 56.9. Osaka reports 10 new cases, reaching double figures for the first time since May 13.

Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea reopen after being closed for four months. There is a limit on the number of visitors, who must book tickets in advance for a specific day. There are also temperature checks at the entrance and visitors are asked to wear masks. Parades and shows are canceled, and visitors may not shake hands or do high fives with characters.

June and Earlier

June 30

Tokyo reports 54 new cases, with the daily total rising above 50 for the fifrth successive day. The average daily total over the past 7-day period rises to 55.1. Yokohama reports 28 new cases, of which 26 are host club employees. A total of 138 cases are reported nationwide.

June 29

Tokyo reports 58 new cases, with the daily total rising above 50 for the fourth successive day. The average daily total over the past 7-day period rises to 51.9, going over 50, which is one of the benchmarks for renewed business suspension requests. Hokkaidō reports 11 new cases, including 3 in Otaru and 7 in Sapporo.

June 28

Tokyo reports 60 new cases, its highest daily total since the state of emergency was lifted. The average daily total over the past 7-day period rises to 47.7, approaching 50, which is one of the benchmarks for renewed business suspension requests. In Otaru, Hokkaidō, 14 new cases are reported connected to an establishment offering daytime karaoke.

June 26

Japan reports 105 new cases, topping 100 for the first time since May 9. Around 80% are in the Tokyo metropolitan area, with 54 in Tokyo, 7 in Kanagawa, 16 in Saitama, and 4 in Chiba. In Tokyo, the average daily total over the past week rises to 41.6. Governor Koike  attributes the increase to group testing efforts, saying that expert analysis does not see this as a second wave.

June 25

Tokyo reports 48 news cases. The average daily total over the past week rises to 38.9.

June 24

Tokyo reports 55 new cases, with the daily total rising above 50 for the first time since there were 57 new cases on May 5. The average daily total over the past week rises to 37.9. There are 9 new cases in Otaru, Hokkaidō, which are all connected to an establishment offering daytime karaoke.

June 19

The Japanese professional baseball season begins after a three-month delay, with games played behind closed doors. The shortened season will have 120 instead of 143 games.

Tokyo reports 35 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,709. The average daily total over the past week rises to 34.

The government lifts its requests for voluntary restrictions on crossing prefectural borders. From today, it also allows concerts and other events with up to 1,000 people to take place. Provided they take measures against infection, establishments offering flirtatious settai services and live music venues can also reopen. These changes are part of a government plan to gradually reopen the economy from May 25, when the state of emergency ended, to July 31 through a series of three-week stages.

June 18

Tokyo reports 41 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,674. The average daily total over the past week rises to 32.6. New cases are reported for the first time in more than a month in Miyagi (51 days), Fukushima (41 days), Niigata, and Shiga Prefectures. There is concern that the imminent lifting of requests to refrain from crossing prefectural borders could cause more infections in regional Japan.

June 17

Tokyo reports 16 new cases, with the daily total dropping below 20 for the first time in a week. The average daily total over the past week falls slightly to 29.9.

June 16

Tokyo reports 27 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,619. The average daily total over the past week is now 30.1, which is considerably higher than the threshold of 20 that was one of the criteria for announcing the alert on June 2.

June 15

Tokyo reports 48 cases, rising above 40 for the second consecutive day, bringing its overall total to 5,592. Of these, 20 are identified in group testing of Shinjuku nightlife establishments.

June 14

Tokyo records 47 new cases, with the daily total rising above 40 for the first time since there were 57 new cases on May 5. Of these, 32 are related to adult nightlife establishments, including 18 in a cluster connected to employees at a reopened host club in Kabukichō, Shinjuku. The metropolis now has a total of 5,544 cases. Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura says that the 18 people related to the host club were asymptomatic, attributing the number of cases identified to positive efforts to detect carriers and prevent a second wave of infections.

June 11

Tokyo lifts its ongoing alert and will allow pachinko parlors, amusement arcades, and other entertainment facilities to reopen. On the same day it reports 22 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,448. It is the first time it has reported more than 20 cases since June 6. 

June 7

Tokyo reports 14 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,369. The average daily total over the past week rises over 20 for the first time since the end of the state of emergency on May 25, reaching 21.

June 4

Tokyo reports 28 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,323. The average daily total over the past week rises to 18.3.

June 3

Tokyo reports 12 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,295. The average daily total over the past week rises slightly to 16.4.

June 2

Tokyo reports 34 new cases, the first time its daily total has been above 30 since May 14. This brings its overall total to 5,283. The average daily total over the past week is now 16.3. Governor Koike issues a Tokyo Alert, calling for vigilance from residents.

The warning is based on a number of benchmarks prepared by the metropolis for deciding on relaxation of business suspension requests.

June 1

Tokyo reports 13 new cases, bringing its total to 5,249. Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture reports 16 new cases, lifting its total to 113 over the past 10 days.

May 31

Tokyo reports 5 new cases, dropping below 10 for the first time since May 26. Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture reports 12 new cases, lifting its total to 97 over the past nine days.

May 30

Tokyo reports 14 new cases, meaning it now has 0.67 total cases per 100,000 people over the past week, rising above the 0.5 target previously set by the government for lifting the state of emergency.

May 29

Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture reports 26 new cases. Mayor Kitahashi Kenji says the city is in the middle of a second wave.

Tokyo Governor Koike Yuriko says that the metropolis will move to the second of its three-stage roadmap for reopening the economy on June 1. Business suspension requests will be relaxed for cram schools, movie theaters, commercial facilities, and sports gyms, on the understanding that they will take thorough measures to prevent infection. At a press conference, Koike stresses that it will be a long fight to contain the coronavirus.

Tokyo reports 22 new cases, the first time the total has risen above 20 since May 14. It has reported new cases in double figures for the past four days.

May 28

Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture has now reported 43 new cases over the previous six days. Fukuoka has 0.88 total cases per 100,000 people over the past week, rising above the 0.5 target previously set by the government for lifting the state of emergency. Hokkaidō, which did not meet this target at the time its state of emergency was lifted, has seen its figure rise further to 1.03.

May 27

The city of Kitakyūshū in Fukuoka Prefecture warns of a second wave of infections after reporting a total of 22 new cases over the previous five days. It closes some public and tourist facilities until June 18, having removed restrictions after the state of emergency was lifted.

May 25

The government lifts the COVID-19 state of emergency in the five remaining prefectures of Hokkaidō, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba. It is one and a half months since the initial state of emergency was declared on April 7. There is no immediate return to everyday life, though, as restrictions will be eased in stages.

In the five prefectures where the state of emergency is lifted, Tokyo reports 8 new cases, Hokkaidō 2, and Kanagawa and Saitama 1 each.

May 23

Tokyo reports 2 new cases, bringing its total to 5,138. In the other prefectures still under a state of emergency, Kanagawa reports 5 cases, Saitama 1, Chiba 0, and Hokkaidō 9. Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura says at a press conference that a positive trend is continuing.

May 22

Tokyo reports 3 new cases, bringing its total to 5,136. It is the lowest daily total since the state of emergency began on April 7.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government releases a three-stage roadmap toward the reopening of businesses. In the first stage, it will allow libraries and museums to reopen and restaurants and bars to stay open two hours later, until 10:00 at night. If the government lifts the state of emergency on May 25, the first stage would come into effect the following day. In the second stage, shopping malls, theaters, movie theaters, and cram schools will be allowed to reopen, while the third stage will let amusement parks and pachinko parlors reopen and permit restaurants and bars to operate until midnight.

May 21

The government lifts the state of emergency in Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyōgo Prefectures. It will make a further decision on May 25 about lifting it in the remaining prefectures of Tokyo, Saitama, Chiba, Kanagawa, and Hokkaidō. With 59 cases over the past seven days, Tokyo has achieved the target of 70 or below for the first time.

Tokyo announces that 58 cases were unreported, 6 were reported twice, and 5 negative cases were wrongly reported as positive. This adds 47 to its cumulative total. With the 11 new cases for the day, Tokyo’s overall figure rises to 5,133.

May 20

The Japan High School Baseball Federation announces the cancellation of the summer high school baseball tournament for the first time in the postwar era.

Tokyo reports 5 new cases, bringing its overall total to 5,075. It has had 78 new cases over the past week.

May 19

Tokyo reports 5 new cases, equaling its lowest daily total since the announcement of the state of emergency and marking two weeks in which there have been fewer than 50 new daily cases in the metropolis. However, to meet the government target for lifting the state of emergency of 0.5 or fewer total cases per 100,000 people over the past week, Tokyo—with a population of 14 million—still needs to reduce its cases to 70 in one week.

Osaka Prefecture reports 3 new cases, while there are zero in neighboring Kyoto and Hyōgo. These three Kansai prefectures are meeting the government target ahead of a decision to be made on May 21 about lifting the state of emergency in the remaining eight prefectures.

May 15

Apparel maker Renown announces that it has gone bankrupt with debts of ¥13.8 billion. Temporary closures of department stores and shopping malls brought a slump in sales. It is the first listed company in Japan to go bankrupt due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tokyo reports 9 new cases, bringing its total to 5,036. This is the tenth successive day that there have been fewer than 50 cases and the first time since March 22 that the total has been less than 10.

May 14

Prime Minister Abe Shinzō orders the government to compile a second fiscal 2020 supplementary budget. The first ¥25.7 trillion supplementary budget enacted on April 30 included ¥100,000 payments to all residents and payments of up to ¥2 million for small and medium-sized businesses that suffered major drops in sales. Among its provisions, the second budget will almost double the daily maximum subsidy for companies to retain employees while their business is suspended to ¥15,000.

Prime Minister Abe lifts the state of emergency in 39  prefectures. They include Ibaraki, Ishikawa, Gifu, Aichi, and Fukuoka, which had been among 13 prefectures designated for stepped-up measures. The state of emergency will continue in Hokkaidō, Chiba, Saitama, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Kyoto, Osaka, and Hyōgo, with a decision to be made later on a possible early end on May 21. 

May 13

The Japan Sumō Association announces that 28-year-old rikishi Shōbushi has died of multiple organ failure due to pneumonia caused by COVID-19. He was hospitalized on April 8 and tested positive for the virus at another hospital on April 12. This is the first fatality reported in Japan for someone under 30.

May 12

Toyota announces that it expects its operating profit to fall by 79.5% year on year to ¥500 billion in the fiscal year ending March 2021. The pandemic has brought major economic disruption around the world and production and sales are projected to plummet. The company projects it will sell 8.9 million vehicles, which would be the first drop below 10 million units in eight years.

Tokyo reports 28 new cases, meaning that it has now had a week with fewer than 50 new cases reported each day.

May 11

Tokyo Governor Koike says that the metropolitan government has found 111 unreported cases and 35 that were reported twice. It will later add 76 cases to its total.

Tokyo reports 15 new cases. This is the first time the daily figure has dropped below 20 since March 30.

May 10

Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura says that the state of emergency may be lifted in the 34 prefectures that have not been designated for stepped-up measures, as well as Ibaraki and Gifu.

May 9

Tokyo reports 39 new cases, meaning that the daily number of new cases has been below 100 for a week. Reduced testing during national holidays played a part in the earlier part of this period, but the lower numbers have continued even after the end of the holidays. A man in his eighties dies in Miyagi Prefecture, marking the first fatality in Tōhoku. The area has had relatively fewer cases than the rest of the country, and includes Iwate, the only prefecture to have reported zero cases.

A case reported on Mikurajima is the first on any of a number of Japan’s outlying islands that are administered by the prefecture of Tokyo. Mikurajima is 200 kilometers south of the capital.

May 8

Tokyo reports 39 new cases, marking the sixth consecutive day that the number of cases has been below 100. While the closure of some medical institutions during much of this period has played a part, business closures and efforts to reduce trips outside seem to be starting to show their effects.

May 7

There are 96 new nationwide cases (including those in airport screening), as the figure drops below 100 for the first time in over a month. The 23 new cases in Tokyo amount to the capital’s lowest daily total since the declaration of a state of emergency. However, these figures are influenced by coming after a national holiday when some medical institutions were not open.

The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare approves the antivirus drug remdesivir, using fast-track screening procedures. The drug was developed by US company Gilead Sciences for treatment of Ebola, but has shown some effectiveness in treating COVID-19. It is due to go into use from this month.

May 4

Tokyo reports 87 new cases, bringing its total to 4,654. Hokkaidō reports 31 new cases for the day, with 29 of them in Sapporo, registering a new daily high for the prefectural capital. The government decides to extend to May 31 the nationwide state of emergency that had been due to expire on May 6.

May 2

Tokyo reports 160 new cases, reaching a total of 4,477. The number of nationwide fatalities (excluding cruise ship passengers) reaches 500,  and Tokyo is the prefecture with the most deaths at 141, followed by Osaka with 46, Hokkaidō with 40, and Kanagawa with 38. Tokyo’s highest daily total of 15 deaths came on May 1.

May 1

Tokyo reports another 165 cases, bringing its total to 4,317. This follows two days in which there were fewer than 50 new cases. Prime Minister Abe states plans to extend the nationwide state of emergency for around a month, with the announcement to be made by May 6.

April 30

The supplementary budget including ¥100,000 payments to all residents is enacted in the Diet. It amounts to ¥25.7 trillion, of which ¥12.9 trillion is earmarked for the payments. This brings Japanese government bond issuance to a record ¥58.2 trillion in fiscal 2020, lifting the bond dependency ratio to 45.5%.

April 29

Prime Minister Abe suggests the state of emergency will be extended beyond May 6, saying that as the number of infections continue to rise, it is difficult to say that the outbreak is over. He later says that he is considering a proposal to shift the start of the school year from April to September, as one among many options.

April 28

Tokyo reports 112 new cases, bringing its overall total to 4,059.

April 27

Tokyo reports 39 new cases, bringing its overall total to 3,947. It is the second successive day that fewer than 100 cases have been reported in the metropolis, although Monday’s figures have a tendency to be lower due to reduced numbers of tests on Sunday. Governor Koike Yuriko tells residents on her regular Internet broadcast that it is not a time to relax, and going outside should be kept to a minimum to prevent further spread and strain on medical resources. She says, “What we do today will save the Tokyo two weeks in the future.”

April 26

Tokyo reports 72 new cases, marking the first time the daily figure has been less than 100 since April 13.

The All Japan High School Athletic Federation on Sunday makes the unprecedented decision to cancel this year’s Interscholastic Athletic Meet, scheduled for August.

April 25

Tokyo’s “Stay Home Week to Save Lives,” a rebranding of Golden Week, begins. The period will run through May 6.

April 24

Tokyo reports 161 new cases, bringing its overall total to 3,733. The speed of growth remains high, although it has dropped compared with earlier in the month.

An infection cluster at Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital grows to 41 cases, and it has stopped accepting new patients.

April 23

Tokyo Governor Koike calls the period from April 25 to May 6, including the Golden Week holidays when travel is usually popular, “Stay Home Week to Save Lives,” asking residents to further refrain from leaving the home. As more people are using local supermarkets rather than those at big stations, she also calls for people to go shopping just once every three days to reduce crowding.

Actress Okae Kumiko dies from pneumonia caused by COVID-19. She was 63. On April 6, she was urgently admitted to the hospital and tested positive. It is thought that radiation therapy for breast cancer in January and February may have weakened her immune system.

April 22

After weekends when the Shōnan coast has seen major traffic congestion, including vehicles from other prefectures, Kanagawa Governor Kuroiwa Yūji urges people not to visit at a time when they should be staying indoors. Other coastal areas like Kujūkuri Beach in Chiba Prefecture have faced the same issue, and local governments are alarmed at the prospect of visitors bringing the virus with them during the upcoming Golden Week holidays.

It is announced that a man in Saitama Prefecture who was told to self-quarantine at home due to his mild symptoms died on April 21. Although he was found to be infected on April 16, the rapid rise in cases meant that he was unable to get a hospital bed and had to recuperate at home. He was admitted to the hospital on April 21 after his condition quickly deteriorated the previous day.

April 20

McDonald’s Japan closes dining areas at all its restaurants in 13 prefectures designated by the government for stepped-up measures against COVID-19. The areas will remain closed until May 6.

April 18

Japan’s total COVID-19 cases rise above 10,000. From the first recorded infection on January 15, it took around two months to reach 1,000 cases. However, the pace of infection has shown a clear increase from late March, and over the last 10 days there have been around 1,000 new cases every two days. While the number of cases overall is still relatively low, unless the pace of increase is slowed Japan could face the same situation as seriously affected Western countries in the next few weeks.

April 17

Tokyo reports 201 new cases, bringing its total to 2,794. It is the first time that the metropolis has registered more than 200 new cases in one day.

April 16

The government announces that the state of emergency will be extended from the initial seven heavily urban prefectures to the whole country, due to the increasingly rapid rise in cases and some other prefectures having recorded more than 100 infections. 

Prime Minster Abe Shinzō announces that the government is planning to give ¥100,000 in cash per person as part of economic measures responding to the coronavirus outbreak, which will be included in a revision of the supplementary budget for fiscal 2020. This replaces the plan for payments of ¥300,000 to households suffering serious drops in income.

April 14

The government decides to postpone the ceremonial investiture of Crown Prince Fumihito as first in line to the Japanese throne. It had planned to hold scaled-down ceremonies on April 19, but these will now take place at a later date.

April 13

Tokyo reports 91 new cases, bringing its total to 2,159. Meanwhile, in Kansai, the chief and deputy chief of Kobe Nishi Police Station are found to be infected, among many cases stemming from a party held at the end of March. Around 120 officers are self-isolating at home. Four doctors at the Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital also test positive for the coronavirus following a case involving a nurse at the hospital reported on April 11.

April 12

Tokyo reports 166 new cases. Governor Koike says in a YouTube video that it was unclear how infection occurred in 64 cases, but it was believed that 87 cases were due to transmission within medical facilities. Tokyo now has 2,068 cases overall, of which 75% have been reported since the start of April. Other prefectures like Kanagawa and Chiba under a state of emergency are also recording new daily cases in double figures as the national total rises to around 7,000.

April 11

Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital reports 13 cases among patients and staff.

Tokyo reports 197 new cases, setting a record high total for the fourth consecutive day, bringing the overall figure to 1,902.

April 10

Tokyo reports 189 new cases, the highest single-day total to date, bringing the overall number of infections to 1,705. The metropolis is aiming to slow down the spread of COVID-19 by requesting closure of bars and nightclubs, as well as shorter opening hours for izakaya and restaurants.

The first reported case in Tottori means that Iwate is now the only prefecture with zero infections.

April 9

Tokyo reports a record 181 new cases, with the rate of increase rising by almost 40 from April 8. It now has 1,519 cases altogether, of which 998 were reported since the beginning of April.

Aichi Governor Ōmura Hideaki asks that the prefecture be added to the list of areas covered by the state of emergency, due to its high number of cases.

April 8

Tokyo reports 144 new cases, the highest daily total to date for the metropolis. The figure previously topped 100 on April 4 and 5 before falling below it for the next two days. Kanagawa, also under a state of emergency, reported a record 43 new cases.

April 7

Another 80 new cases are reported in Tokyo, bringing its total up to 1,195. Of the overall figure, 56% came in the first week of April. In 57 of the April 7 cases, it was unclear how infection occurred.

At a press conference after he declared a state of emergency, Prime Minister Abe said that if infections continued to grow at the same pace in Tokyo, there would be more than 10,000 cases after two weeks and more than 80,000 after a month. However, by reducing personal contact by 70% or preferably 80%, the number of infections would peak and start to decline after two weeks. He also called for people living in cities not to move to other prefectures, such as the homes of relatives, where there are many seniors who would be at high risk if infections spread in those areas and less robust medical systems to care for them.

Prime Minister Abe declares a state of emergency in the prefectures of Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba, Osaka, Hyōgo, and Fukuoka, which will last until May 6. While there will be no city lockdowns as seen in some countr

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