Japan Data

Coronavirus Cases in Japan by Prefecture

Society

There are 4,312 new cases in Japan on April 14, topping 4,000 for the first time since January 28.

(Data provided through the FastAlert real-time COVID-19  data service from JX Press.)

Click here for information on infections by country.

April 14

There are 4,312 new cases in Japan, topping 4,000 for the first time since January 28. There are record totals of 1,130 in Osaka and 507 in Hyōgo, while Tokyo reports 591 new cases, which is its highest total since the lifting of the second state of emergency.

Omi Shigeru, who heads the government COVID-19 subcommittee, says that Japan has entered a fourth wave of infections.

April 13

Japan confirms 3,455 new cases, including 1,099 in Osaka, which is the first time it has reported more than 1,000, and a new record of 391 in Hyōgo. There are 510 new cases in Tokyo.

April 12

There are 2,019 new cases reported in Japan; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. The number of severe cases rises by 43 to 563. Osaka and Hyōgo post their highest totals for a Monday to date of 603 and 159, respectively. Tokyo reports 306 new cases.

April 11

Of the 2,777 new cases in Japan, there are 760 in Osaka and 421 in Tokyo.

April 10

There are 3,697 new cases in Japan, including new records of 918 in Osaka and 315 in Hyōgo. Tokyo reports 570 new cases.

April 9

Japan reports 3,454 new cases nationwide, including 883 in Osaka, 537 in Tokyo and 314 in Hyōgo. There have now been 500,000 cases in total across the country to date. The government decides to add Tokyo, Okinawa, and Kyoto to those covered by pre-emergency measures from April 12.

April 8

There are 3,447 new cases in Japan, including 905 in Osaka, which sets a record for the third consecutive day. Elsewhere in Nara, Hyōgo reports 311 and Nara a record 88 new cases. Tokyo reports 545 new cases, for a second consecutive day over 500, and requests the national government to apply pre-emergency measures.

April 7

There are 3,451 new cases nationwide, as the daily total tops 3,000 for the first time since January 30. New records are set in Osaka (878), Hyōgo (328), Nara, and Wakayama, as the spread of cases increases more rapidly in Kansai. Tokyo confirms 555 new cases, which is the first time it has reported more than 500 in a day since February 6.

April 6

Japan confirms 2,656 new cases, with Osaka setting a new record of 719, ahead of Tokyo with 399 and Hyōgo with 276, its highest total since the end of the second state of emergency.

April 5

There are 1,572 new cases reported in Japan, including 241 in Osaka and a record high of 71 in Nara; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing.

The prefectures of Osaka, Hyōgo, and Miyagi are placed under a state of pre-emergency until May 5 with stricter measures to prevent the spread of infections, including requesting food and drink establishments to close at eight in the evening.

April 4

There are 2,471 new cases across Japan, with 593 in Osaka setting a record for a Sunday. Tokyo confirms 355 new cases.

April 3

Japan reports 2,775 new cases, including a record high of 666 in Osaka and 446 in Tokyo.

April 2

There are 2,759 new cases nationwide, of which 613 are in Osaka and 440 are in Tokyo.

April 1

There are 2,606 new cases across the country, including 616 in Osaka, its highest since January 16, and 475 in Tokyo.

March 31

Japan reports 2,843 new cases, including 599 in Osaka, 414 in Tokyo, and record highs of 200 in Miyagi and 81 in Aomori. The Osaka prefectural government requests the national government to implement pre-emergency measures to prevent further spread.

March 30

Japan confirms 2,087 new cases, including 432 in Osaka and 364 in Tokyo.

March 29

There are 1,345 new cases nationwide on March 29, including 234 in Tokyo and 213 in Osaka, where Governor Yoshimura Hirofumi calls for the national government to designate the prefecture as requiring stronger measures.

March 28

Japan reports 1,785 new cases; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. Osaka confirms 323 new cases, for the third consecutive day with a total above 300. Tokyo’s total of 313 is 57 higher than the previous Sunday.

March 27

Japan confirms 2,071 new cases, including 430 in Tokyo, which is 88 higher than the previous Saturday, and 286 in Osaka.

March 26

There are 2,026 new cases across Japan, as the daily total tops 2,000 for the first time since February 6. Osaka reports 300 new cases, while there are 153 in Miyagi.

March 25

Japan reports 1,917 new cases, including 161 in Miyagi, the prefecture’s second-highest total to date, and records of 59 in Ehime and 49 in Yamagata.  Tokyo confirms 394 new cases.

March 24

There are 1,917 new cases, including 420 in Tokyo, which is its highest total so far in March. Miyagi, which has declared its own state of emergency reports 171 new cases, its highest total to date, of which 131 are in Sendai.

March 23

There are 1,503 new cases nationwide. Miyagi reports its second highest total to date of 121, of which 91 are in Sendai. Tokyo confirms 337 new cases, and Osaka 183, which is its highest total since the state of emergency was lifted in the prefecture on February 28. 

March 22

Japan reports 822 new cases, including 187 in Tokyo; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. 

March 21

Japan reports 1,119 new cases, including 256 in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period rises above 300 for the first time since February 23 to 301.1.

March 20

Japan confirms 1,517 new cases, of which 342 in Tokyo. Miyagi reports a new record of 125 daily cases.

After talks including the national and Tokyo authorities and the International Olympic Committee, it is announced formally that overseas fans will be banned from attending the Olympics and Paralympics this year, due to the pandemic.

March 19

There are 1,464 new cases across the country, including 303 in Tokyo.

March 18

Japan confirms 1,499 new cases, including 323 in Tokyo, 160 in Kanagawa, 122 in Chiba, and 115 in Saitama. The average daily total over the past 7-day period in Tokyo drops by 1.7 to 297.1. Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide decides to lift the state of emergency in the capital-region prefectures on March 21, as planned.

March 17

There are 1,535 new cases across the country, including 409 in Tokyo, which marks the first time it has exceeded 400 since February 18. Its average daily total over the past 7-day period rises  to 298.8. There are also 132 new cases in Saitama, 93 in Kanagawa, and 91 in Chiba. Miyagi confirms a record 107 new cases.

March 16

Japan confirms 1,134 new cases, including 300 in Tokyo, 96 in Saitama, 91 in Kanagawa, and 76 in Chiba. 

March 15

There are 695 new cases nationwide; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. Tokyo reports 175 new cases, and its average daily total over the past 7-day period continues to rise slightly to 287.6.

March 14

There are 989 new cases across the country, including 239 in Tokyo, 109 in Kanagawa, 106 in Chiba, and 77 in Saitama. The number of severe cases decreases by 9 to 328.

March 13

Japan confirms 1,320 new cases, and the number of severe cases falls by 17 to 337. There are 330 new cases in Tokyo.

March 12

Japan reports 1,271 new cases, including 304 in Tokyo.

March 11

There are 1,319 new cases nationwide, including 335 in Tokyo, 126 in Saitama, 125 in Kanagawa, and 122 in Chiba.

March 10

There are 1,316 new cases across Japan, which is the first time the national total has risen above 1,300 for 19 days. This includes 340 in Tokyo, 135 in Saitama, 124 in Kanagawa, and 106 in Chiba. The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare announces that as of March 9, there have been 271 cases in 21 prefectures of coronavirus variants that initially spread in Britain and Brazil. In addition to 74 found at airport screening, this is a total of 345.

March 9

Japan confirms 1,128 new cases, including 290 in Tokyo, 106 in Saitama, 100 in Kanagawa, and 82 in Chiba, as the rate of decrease slows in the captal region. Osaka also has 103 new cases.

March 8

There are 600 new cases across Japan; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. The number of severe cases increases by 7 to 380. With 116 cases in Tokyo, 73 in Chiba, 65 in Saitama, and 59 in Kanagawa, 313 cases or more than half the national total comes in the capital-region prefectures.

March 7

Japan reports 1,065 new cases, and the number of severe cases falls by 2 to 373. There are 237 new cases in Tokyo, 123 in Saitama, 119 in Kanagawa, and 113 in Chiba. The combined total for these four prefectures is 592 or more than half the overall national total.

March 6

Japan confirms 1,055 new cases, including 293 in Tokyo.

March 5

There are 1,148 new cases, of which 301 are in Tokyo.

March 4

Japan confirms 1,170 new cases, including 279 in Tokyo.

March 3

There are 1,244 new cases nationwide, and the number of severe cases falls by 6 to 407 Tokyo reports 316 new cases. 

March 2

Japan reports 888 new cases, including 232 in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period falls to 263.1. Based on prefectural reporting, the total fatalities to date rise above 8,000.

March 1

There are 698 new cases across Japan; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. The number of severe cases increases by 2 to 436. There are 127 new cases in Chiba and 121 in Tokyo.

February 28

Japan confirms 999 new cases, and the number of severe cases drops by 6 to 434. Tokyo reports 329 new cases.

February 27

Of the 1,214 new cases across the country, 337 are in Tokyo. The number of severe cases nationwide drops by 17 to 440.

February 26

There are 1,055 new cases nationwide, including 270 in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period falls to 267.9. The government decides to lift the state of emergency in Aichi, Gifu, Osaka, Kyoto, Hyōgo, and Fukuoka Prefectures on February 28. It will remain in place in the prefectures of Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba, with a decision to be made on March 5 as to whether to lift it on March 7.

February 25

There are 1,075 new cases nationwide, and 74 fatalities. The number of severe cases drops by 15 to 472. Tokyo confirms 340 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 279.7.

February 24

Japan reports 921 new cases, and the number of severe cases drops by 4 to 487. There are 213 new cases in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period falls to 294.7, dropping below 300 for the first time since November 14. Prime Minister Suga says vaccination of seniors aged over 65 will begin from April 12.

February 23

There are 741 new cases, including 275 in Tokyo. The number of severe cases drops by 19 to 491. The governors of Osaka, Hyōgo, and Kyoto meet with Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura Yasutoshi and request for the state of emergency to be lifted early in their prefectures, on February 28.

February 22

Of the 780 new cases across the country, 178 are in Tokyo.

February 21

There are 1,032 new cases nationwide, and the number of severe cases drops by 15 to 511. Tokyo reports 272 new cases.

February 20

Japan confirms 1,234 new cases, of which 327 are in Tokyo.

February 19

There are 1,303 new cases across Japan, including 353 in Tokyo.

February 18

Japan reports 1,529 new cases, and the number of severe cases drops by 43 to 564. There are 76 fatalities. Tokyo confirms 445 new cases and 27 fatalities.

February 17

Japan confirms 1,445 new cases, of which 378 are in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period falls to 353.6. The number of severe cases nationwide decreases by 37 to 607.

February 16

There are 1,305 new cases across Japan, including 350 in Tokyo, so its 7-day daily average falls to 369.7. The number of severe cases nationwide drops by 14 to 644. However, there are 101 fatalities, including 27 in Tokyo  and 14 in Kanagawa.

February 15

Japan confirms 965 new cases, which is the first time the nationwide daily total has dropped below 1,000 since November 16; figures for Mondays are typically lower than for other days, due to reduced weekend testing. The number of severe cases drops by 10 to 658. Based on prefectural reporting, the total fatalities to date rise above 7,000. Tokyo reports 200 new cases, and its average daily total over the past 7-day period falls slightly to 378.6

Tokyo reports that it failed to record 838 cases from November 18, 2020, until January 31, due to workers not pressing the button for final confirmation. Its record high daily total on January 7 is increased by 73 to 2,520.

February 14

There are 1,364 new cases nationwide, of which 371 are in Tokyo, so its 7-day daily average drops to 380. The number of severe cases across Japan drops by 25 to 668.

The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare approves US drugmaker Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine. It is the first vaccine to be approved in Japan, and has an efficacy rate of 95% in clinical trials. Vaccination of medical workers is set to begin on February 17. Japan’s population aged over 65, which is 36 million, will begin being vaccinated from April 1, with a target completion period of around three months.

February 13

Of the 1,261 new cases across the country, 369 are in Tokyo, and its average daily total over the past 7-day period falls below 400 for the first time since November 20 to 388.3. The number of severe cases nationwide drops by 8 to 693.

February 12

Japan reports 1,301 new cases, and the number of severe cases drops by 12 to 701. There are 307 new cases in Tokyo, where the 7-day daily average drops to 426.9.

February 11

There are 1,695 new cases nationwide, including 434 in Tokyo, where the average daily total over the past 7-day period falls below 500 for the first time since December 12. The number of severe cases decreases by 23 to 713.

February 10

Japan reports 1,885 new cases, for a fourth consecutive day under 2,000. However, there is a new record of 121 fatalities, including 25 in Tokyo, 16 in Saitama, and 13 in Chiba. The number of severe cases falls by 23 to 736. Tokyo reports 491 new cases, and its 7-day daily average drops to 508.3.

February 9

There are 1,570 new cases across Japan, and the number of severe cases drops by 14 to 759. Tokyo reports 412 new cases, so its average daily total over the past 7-day period drops to 534.7.

February 8

Japan reports 1,216 new cases, and the number of severe cases drops by 22 to 773. Although Monday figures are usually lower, due to reduced weekend testing, there is a clear trend toward a decline in infections. The government has begun to consider lifting the extended state of emergency early in some of the 10 prefectures where it is ongoing. The 276 new cases in Tokyo bring its average daily total over the past 7-day period down to 555.3.

February 7

Japan confirms 1,631 new cases, and the number of severe cases falls by 20 to 795. There are 429 new cases in Tokyo.

February 6

There are 2,729 new cases nationwide and 94 fatalities. Tokyo reports 639 new cases and 21 fatalities, bringing its total fatalities over 1,000.

February 5

Japan reports 2,372 new cases, including 577 in Tokyo, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period down to 619.7. There are 108 fatalities nationwide, and the number of severe cases falls by 15 to 877.

February 4

There are 2,576 new cases across the country. With the addition of cruise ship passengers, Japan’s overall total is now over 400,000, just over three weeks after it rose above 300,000 on January 13, although the pace of new infections is now slowing. The number of severe cases falls by 5 to 892. There are 104 fatalities. Tokyo reports 734 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period down to 661.3.

February 3

Japan confirms 120 fatalities, marking a new daily high for the second consecutive day. Of these, 32 come in Tokyo and 19 in Kanagawa, while Saitama, Aichi, and Osaka all record double figures. Total fatalities nationwide to date rise above 6,000, just 11 days after topping 5,000 on January 23. There are 2,631 new cases across the country, and the number of severe cases falls by 40 to 897.

February 2

The government decides to extend the state of emergency in 10 of the 11 prefectures where it is ongoing (excluding Tochigi). On the same day, there are 2,323 new cases in Japan, down to around a third of the total of 7,882 when the state of emergency was announced on January 8. However, serious cases remain high at 937, and there are 119 fatalities. Tokyo confirms 556 new cases.

February 1

Japan confirms 1,791 new cases, which is the first time the total has fallen below 2,000 since six weeks earlier, on December 21. Figures on Monday are usually lower, due to reduced weekend testing. While the rate of infection is clearly slowing, hospitals are still under strain, and the government plans to extend the state of emergency for one month in 10 of the 11 prefectures where it is ongoing (excluding Tochigi). Tokyo reports 393 new cases, bringing its total past the six-digit mark, to 100,234. Some 40,000 of these cases have come in 2021.

Three Liberal Democratic Party lawmakers resign from the party after it is reported they made a late-night visit to a nightclub in Ginza, Tokyo, despite the state of emergency. The three are Matsumoto Jun, former chairman of the National Public Safety Commission, Tanose Taidō, state minister of education, and Otsuka Takashi, deputy head of the LDP’s parliamentary affairs committee. Toyama Kiyohiko, of junior coalition partner Kōmeitō, resigns as a lawmaker after a separate visit to a Ginza club.

January 31

A total of 2,673 new cases are reported across Japan, including 633 in Tokyo. The number of severe cases nationwide drops by 1 to 973.

January 30

There are 3,345 new cases across Japan, of which 769 are in Tokyo.

January 29

Japan reports 3,535 new cases, including 868 in Tokyo, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 943.6.

January 28

Of the 4,132 new cases in Japan, 1,064 are in Tokyo, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period below 1,000 for the first time since January 5, down to 987.4. There are 113 fatalities nationwide.

January 27

Japan confirms 3,970 new cases, of which 973 are in Tokyo, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period down to 1,045.7. Despite the overall decrease in infections, there are 90 fatalities, with record highs of 23 in Osaka and 18 in Tokyo. The number of severe cases rises by 47 to 1,043.

January 26

There are 3,850 new cases across the country. While this almost 1,500 lower than the 5,319 new cases one week earlier on January 19, the third wave is still not over. Tokyo reports 1,026 new cases. There are 104 fatalities nationwide, including 14 in Osaka and 13 each in Tokyo and Kanagawa.

January 25

Japan confirms 2,762 new cases. While this figure is usually lower on Mondays due to reduced weekend testing, it is the first time for it to drop below 3,000 since December 28. The number of cases has dropped from its peak, when there were over 7,000 cases for three consecutive days from January 7 to 9, but the number of severe cases is at its highest point to date of 1,017, and daily fatalities remain high at 74. Tokyo reports 618 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period down to 1,119.

January 24

Japan reports 3,991 new cases, including 986 in Tokyo. This is the first time, the metropolis has confirmed fewer than 1,000 cases since January 12.

January 23

There are 4,714 new cases nationwide, including 1,070 in Tokyo. The total number of fatalities in Japan rises above 5,000, just two weeks after it topped 4,000 on January 9.

January 22

Of the 5,043 new cases across the country, 1,175 are in Tokyo. There are 108 fatalities, the highest daily total to date. The number of severe cases falls by 3 to 1,011.

A girl under 10 years old in Tokyo is found to be infected with the COVID-19 variant spreading in Britain, which is thought to have been transmitted through community infection.

January 21

Japan reports 5,651 new cases, of which 1,471 are in Tokyo; total cases in the metropolis top 90,000. The number of severe cases nationwide remains unchanged at 1,014.

January 20

There are 5,531 new cases in Japan, including 1,274 in Tokyo. The number of severe cases rises by 13 to 1,014.

January 19

Japan confirms 5,320 new cases, which is the highest total to date for a Tuesday. The number of severe cases increases by 28 to 1,001. The number of daily fatalities rises above 100 for the first time; the 104 deaths include 16 in Tokyo, 13 in Osaka, and 10 in Saitama.

Okinawa announces it will begin its own state of emergency to last until February 7, and asks residents to refrain from unnecessary trips. It also requests to be included in the national state of emergency.

January 18

There are 4,925 new cases across Japan; the number of cases reported on Mondays is lower than other days due to reduced weekend testing. Tokyo confirms 1,204 new cases, and Kanagawa 957. Yamaguchi reports a record high of 88 new cases.

Prime Minister Suga  announces that Minister for Administrative Reform Kōno Tarō will take responsibility for Japan’s vaccination program. Vaccination is due to start in late February with priority given to health workers and the elderly.

The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare announces that three people in Shizuoka Prefecture tested positive for the same COVID-19 variant that is spreading in Britain. This is the first time the variant has been found in Japan without a traceable infection route. Currently, 45 people in Japan have been confirmed to be infected with the variant.

January 17

Japan reports 5,759 new cases, including 1,592 in Tokyo, which is its highest total to date on a Sunday. The number of severe cases across the country rises by 7 to 972.

January 16

Of the 7,012 new cases across the country, 1,809 are in Tokyo. The number of severe cases nationwide rises by 31 to 965.

January 15

There are 7,132 new cases across the country, including 2,001 in Tokyo, and the number of severe cases rises by 14 to 934.

January 14

Japan confirms 6,605 new cases, and the number of severe cases rises by 20 to 920. There are still high totals for prefectures in a state of emergency, including 1,502 in Tokyo, 985 in Kanagawa, 592 in Osaka, 488 in Chiba, and 455 in Saitama.

January 13

The government adds the prefectures of Osaka, Kyoto, Hyōgo, Aichi, Gifu, Fukuoka, and Tochigi to the COVID-19 state of emergency from January 14 until February 7. There are now 11 prefectures in a state of emergency. The daily nationwide total of 5,869 new cases brings Japan’s overall total above 300,000. The number of severe cases rises by 19 to 900. Tokyo confirms 1,433 new cases, so its average daily total over the past 7-day period drops slightly to 1,746.1.

A total of 25 rail companies in greater Tokyo, including JR East and Tokyo Metro, announce that they will move the time of the last train forward by up to 30 minutes from January 20.

January 12

Japan confirms 4,539 new cases; the lower figure reflects reduced testing on a national holiday. The number of severe cases rises by 17 to 881. There are 970 new cases in Tokyo, as the daily total falls below 1,000 for the first time since January 4. The government announces plans to add Osaka, Kyoto, Hyōgo, Aichi, Gifu, Tochigi, and Fukuoka to the state of emergency.

January 11

There are 4,873 new cases across the country, which is the highest total to date for a Monday, when the figure is usually lower due to reduced weekend testing. The number of severe cases rises by 12 to 864. Tokyo confirms 1,219 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 1,812.7.

The government announces its intention to expand the state of emergency this week to include Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyōgo.

January 10

Japan confirms 6,094 new cases, and the number of severe cases rises by 25 to 852. There are 1,494 new cases in Tokyo.

The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare announces the discovery of a new COVID-19 variant from four passengers on a flight from Brazil.

Prime Minister Suga says of the inclusion of Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyōgo in the state of emergency that the government will act quickly, if necessary.

January 9

The 7,789 new cases in Japan include 2,268 in Tokyo and a record high of 999 in Kanagawa. Nationwide fatalities top 4,000.

The governors of Osaka, Kyoto, and Hyōgo have an online meeting with Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura, in which they call for their prefectures to be included in the state of emergency.

January 8

There are 7,882 new cases nationwide, the highest total to date for the fourth successive day, including 2,392 in Tokyo.

Oriental Land announces that its Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea theme parks will close one hour earlier, at seven in the evening, from January 12 until February 7.

January 7

Japan reports 7,569 new cases, topping the previous record again by a considerable number. This includes 2,447 in Tokyo, the first time the daily total for the metropolis has risen above 2,000, and record highs in Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba Prefectures.

The government announces a state of emergency for these four prefectures, lasting from January 8 until February 7. Bars and restaurants are asked to close by eight in the evening, while residents are requested to work from home if possible, and refrain from leaving the home unnecessarily after eight in the evening.

January 6

There are 6,006 new cases in Japan, surpassing the previous record daily total by more than 1,000. The number of severe cases rises by 13 to 784. Tokyo confirms a record high of 1,591 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period over 1,000 to 1,071. The government is set to announce a state of emergency in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba on January 7.

January 5

Japan reports a record high 4,912 new cases, including Tokyo’s second highest total to date of 1,278, which brings its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 979.4. There are a record 75 fatalities nationwide, while the nationwide number of severe cases rises by 40 to 771. 

Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Hagiuda Kōichi says that the announcement of a state of emergency in the greater Tokyo area would not mean his ministry would request all schools to close. He says that a very small proportion of children develop symptoms or become seriously ill.

January 4

Japan confirms 3,319 new cases. The number of severe cases rises by 17 to 731. Tokyo has 884 new cases, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 919.1. Following the continued spread of infections over the New Year period, Prime Minister Suga says that he is considering announcing a second state of emergency in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba Prefectures.

January 3

There are 3,158 new cases in Japan, including 816 in Tokyo. The number of severe hospitalized cases in the metropolis rises by 7 to a new high of 101.

January 2

Japan confirms 3,058 new cases. There are 814 in Tokyo, which has seen increasing strain on medical services. Governor Koike Yuriko and the governors of neighboring Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba Prefectures call for a new state of emergency in a meeting with Minister for Economic Revitalization Nishimura.

January 1

There are 3,247 new cases across the country on New Year’s Day, including 783 in Tokyo. Due to decreases in testing around the New Year, it is a considerable drop from the previous day, but remains high. The number of severe cases rises by 35 to 716.

December 31

Japan reports a record high 4,520 new cases, considerably greater than the previous record of 3,873 on December 26. Tokyo’s daily total of 1,337 is the first time it has reported more than 1,000. Its total of 19,245 for December is close to twice as many as the 9,850 in November. Kanagawa, Saitama, and Chiba also confirm new daily records. The number of severe cases nationwide rises by 13 to 681.

December 30

Of the 3,852 new cases nationwide, Tokyo reports its second highest total of 944, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 815.7. The number of severe cases decreases by 7 to 668.

Tokyo Governor Koike warns that an explosive rise in cases could happen at any time and calls on residents to stay at home and avoid parties over the New Year period.

December 29

Japan confirms 3,608 new cases, including 856 in Tokyo.

December 28

There are 2,400 new cases; the number of cases reported on Mondays is lower than other days due to reduced weekend testing. Tokyo had 481, its highest total to date for a Monday.

The COVID-19 variant identified as spreading initially in South Africa is found in Japan for the first time.

December 27

Japan reports 2,948 new cases, the highest ever total for a Sunday. The number of severe cases rises by 5 to 659. The 708 new cases in Tokyo bring its total for December alone to 15,627, while there are also 343 in Kanagawa, 233 in Osaka, and 211 in Saitama.

December 26

There are 3,880 new cases across Japan, setting a record for a fourth consecutive day. This includes 949 in Tokyo, 480 in Kanagawa, and 265 in Saitama. The number of severe cases rises by 10 to 654.

The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare reports that a Japanese citizen who recently returned from Britain and a member of his family tested positive for a new coronavirus variant. As a pilot, he was exempt from airport screening.

The government announces a ban on all foreign citizens entering the country from December 28 until the end of January 2021.

December 25

Japan confirms a record number of new cases for a third consecutive day. The total of 3,832 includes 884 in Tokyo, bringing its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 681.

December 24

A new record high of 3,742 new cases across the country includes highest ever totals in Kantō of 888 in Tokyo, 495 in Kanagawa, 251 in Saitama, and 234 in Chiba. The number of severe cases rises 25 to a new record of 644.

December 23

Japan reports a record high of 3,265 new cases, ahead of the 3,211 confirmed on December 11. The number of severe cases decreases by 1 to 619. There are 748 new cases in Tokyo, its second highest total to date.

December 22

Japan confirms 2,688 new cases, and severe cases rise by 17 to a new high of 620. There are 563 new cases in Tokyo, which brings its average daily total over the past 7-day period to more than 630.

December 21

There are 1,808 new cases nationwide; the number of cases reported on Mondays is lower than other days due to reduced weekend testing. With the addition of cruise ship passengers, Japan’s overall total is now over 200,000. The number of severe cases rises by 10 to 603. Tokyo reports 392 new cases, bringing its overall total to 51,838.

December 20

Japan confirms 2,496 new cases. Tokyo reports 556, its highest total for a Sunday, which brings its total for December alone to 10,507. This is the first time it has reported more than 10,000 new cases in a month. Okayama confirms a record high of 111.

December 19

Japan’s 2,982 new cases include 736 in Tokyo, bringing its overall total to 50,890. There are also new highs in Saitama and Okayama, as well as a record-tying total in Kanagawa.

December 18

There are 2,836 new cases across Japan, including 664 in Tokyo, a record high of 201 in Saitama, and 150 in Chiba, which equals its highest total to date.

December 17

Japan sets a new record with 3,214 new cases. Tokyo confirms 822, its highest total to date and more than 100 more than the previous record of 678 on December 16. The capital prefecture’s cumulative total rises to 49,490. There are also new highs in Kanagawa, Hiroshima, and Miyagi Prefectures.

December 16

Japan records 2,993 new cases, its second highest daily total to date, and the number of severe cases rises by 26 to 618. At the end of a three-week period the government said was “crucial” for containing COVID-19, cases continue to rise. Tokyo reports a record 678 new cases, bringing its overall total to 48,668, and there are also new records in Fukushima, Gunma, Kanagawa, Aichi, and Kyoto.

December 15

There are 53 fatalities in Japan, a new daily record, including 11 in Hokkaidō, 10 in Osaka, 9 in Tokyo, and 5 in Hyōgo. The number of severe cases rises 4 to a record high of 592. Osaka Prefecture opens a facility for seriously ill patients. There are 2,436 new cases across the country. Tokyo reports 460, and its average daily total over the past 7-day period rises to 519.

December 14

Japan reports 1,678 new cases; due to reduced weekend testing, there are relatively lower numbers on Mondays. There are now a record 588 severe cases, up 5 from the previous day. Tokyo confirms 305 new cases, raising its average daily total over the past 7-day period to 503.9. Prime Minister Suga suspends the Go To Travel program across the whole country from December 28 to January 11.

December 13

There are 2,389 new cases across the country, including 480 in Tokyo, its highest total to date for a Sunday. The number of severe cases rises by 5 to 583.

December 12

Japan reports 3,041 new cases, exceeding 3,000 for the first time in one day. The number of severe cases also reaches a new high of 578 with a daily increase of 24. There are new records in six prefectures: Tokyo (621), Saitama (199), Gifu (55), Iwate (43), Nagano (32), Kōchi (27), and Yamagata (22).

December 11

There are 2,798 new cases reported in Japan. Six prefectures confirm record high totals: Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima, Kanagawa, Hiroshima, and Ōita. The number of severe cases rises by 11 to 554. Tokyo’s 595 new cases—its second highest total to date—bring its overall total to 46,124, and its severe cases rise by 8 to 67.

The Kanagawa prefectural government announces the death of a man in his fifties at a facility for people with mild or no symptoms. It was discovered when he did not make regular contact by smartphone to report on his health.

December 10

There are 2,974 new cases in Japan, setting a new record for the second consecutive day, including 602 in Tokyo, its highest total to date, and 415 in Osaka. There are also 26 fatalities across the country, including 9 in Osaka and 5 in Hokkaidō.

December 9

Japan confirms a record high of 2,809 new cases, ahead of the previous record of 2,684 set on November 28. Tokyo has its second-highest total of 572, while Osaka has 427 and Aichi and Kanagawa 245 each. There are also high totals in prefectures that have been relatively less seriously affected to date, including 75 in both Hiroshima and Kyoto and 40 in Kagoshima. The number of severe cases rises by 19 to 555, increasing the strain on medical services. 

Omi Shigeru, who heads the government COVID-19 subcommittee, calls for the Go To Travel campaign to be suspended in areas at stage 3, or the second-highest of the four tiers representing the degree of spread of the coronavirus. However, Chief Cabinet Secretary Katō Katsunobu says that there are no prefectures currently judged to be at that level.

December 8

Japan records 2,170 new cases and the number of severe cases rises by 6 to 536. There are 47 fatalities, the highest daily total to date, including 9 in Hokkaidō, 6 in Tokyo, and 4 in Aichi.

December 7

There are 1,517 new cases in Japan; reduced weekend testing means the total is lower on Mondays. However, the number of severe cases rises by 11 to 530. Responding to requests from local authorities with nurse shortages, the government will send Self-Defense Forces nurses to Hokkaidō and Osaka. Tokyo reports 299 new cases, bringing its overall total to 44,003.

December 6

Japan confirms 2,024 new cases, while the number of severe cases falls by 1 to 519. Tokyo’s 327 new cases bring its overall total to 43,704.

December 5

There are 2,508 new cases across the nation, with a new record high of 584 in Tokyo. The number of severe cases rises by 15 to its highest total to date of 520.

December 4

Japan reports 2,438 new cases, and the number of severe cases goes up by 9 to 505. There are 449 new cases in Tokyo, 394 in Osaka, and 215 in Aichi. There are 44 fatalities, the highest total to date, with 13 in Hokkaidō, 8 in Tokyo, 5 in Osaka, and 4 each in Kanagawa and Aichi.

December 3

There are 2,518 new cases across the country, and the number of severe cases rises by 9 to 497. Osaka Governor Yoshimura Hirofumi announces that the prefecture has reached a “red light” emergency and calls on residents to avoid going out unnecessarily until December 15.

December 2

Japan confirms 2,434 new cases, including 500 in Tokyo, 427 in Osaka, 219 in Aichi, and 214 in Kanagawa.

December 1

There are 2,030 new cases across Japan, and the number of severe cases rises by 21 to 493. The 41 fatalities on this day is the highest total ever, and 14 deaths take place in Hokkaidō. After Tokyo reports 372 new cases, Governor Koike meets with Prime Minister Suga and asks for seniors aged 65 and over and those with underlying conditions not to participate in trips to or from Tokyo under the Go To Travel campaign.  Suga expresses his agreement.

Click here for updates from October and November.

(Translated from Japanese. Banner photo © Pakutaso.)

infectious disease virus coronavirus COVID-19