Japan Data

Coronavirus Cases by Country

Health Society Disaster

A periodically updated summary of the number of COVID-19 cases in the most affected countries, with related news updates.

Cases by Country Reported by MHLW as of September 21, 2020

Infections Fatalities
United States 6,805,629 199,512
India 5,487,580 87,882
Brazil 4,544,629 136,895
Russia 1,105,048 19,420
Peru 768,895 31,369
Colombia 765,076 24,208
Mexico 697,663 73,493
South Africa 661,211 15,953
Spain 640,040 30,495
Argentina 631,365 13,053
France 467,614 31,257
Chile 446,274 12,286
Iran 422,140 24,301
Britain 396,744 41,866
Bangladesh 348,918 4,939
Saudi Arabia 329,754 4,485
Iraq 319,035 8,555
Pakistan 306,304 6,420
Turkey 302,867 7,506
Italy 298,156 35,707
Philippines 290,190 4,999
Germany 274,712 9,390
Indonesia 244,676 9,553
Israel 188,427 1,256
Ukraine 182,900 3,652
China 90,369 4,737
Japan 79,142 1,508
South Korea 23,045 385

Created by Nippon.com based on data from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare.

Click here for information on Japanese infections by prefecture and news updates.

September 18

There are now 30 million cases worldwide, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. The top three countries account for 54% of the overall total with 6.7 million in the United States, 5.1 million in India, and 4.4 million in Brazil. India is reporting more than 90,000 cases each day and steadily closing the gap on the United States.

September 7

India now has the second highest number of cases worldwide with 4.2 million, ahead of Brazil with 4.1 million, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. India has had 72,000 fatalities. From mid-August it reported daily cases from 70,000 to over 80,000, but this figure has recently risen above 90,000. Even in the capital, New Delhi, where a reduction in cases encouraged reopening of the economy, there has been a renewed increase in infections.

September 4

Brazil now has more than 4 million cases and 125,000 fatalities, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. It is second for both categories behind the United States, but India has almost as many cases, with 3.9 million. 

August 27

There are now 24.1 million cases worldwide, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. More than half of all cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States (5.8 million), Brazil (3.7 million), and India (3.2 million). The pace in the United States has slowed from around 60,000 daily cases in the second half of July to around 40,000 now. By contrast, the pace in India has increased to around 60,000 daily cases. 

August 11

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now 20 million cases worldwide. It took around six months from the first reports in Wuhan to reach 10 million cases on June 28. From then, it was just 44 days until the total reached 20 million. More than half of all cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States (5.1 million), Brazil (3.1 million), and India (2.2 million). 

August 7

There are now 19.1 million cases worldwide, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. Having topped 17 million on July 30 and 18 million on August 3, the current pace of increase is around 1 million every four days. More than half of all cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States, Brazil, and India. There has also been a notable recent increase in infections in South Africa and other African countries.

August 3

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now 18 million cases worldwide and there have been 689,000 fatalities. More than half of all cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States, Brazil, and India.

July 26

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University indicate that there are now 16 million cases worldwide. It took just three days to rise from 15 million. Around half of all cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States, Brazil, and India.

July 24

The United States now has more than 4 million cases, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, representing around a quarter of all cases worldwide. The pace of growth has increased in the country from mid-July and it is currently reporting 50,000–70,000 new cases each day.

July 23

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now more than 15 million cases worldwide. Almost half of the total cases have been reported in the top three countries: the United States, Brazil, and India. There are also rapid increases in infections in Latin America and Africa.

July 19

World Health Organization statistics indicate that there were a record 259,848 new cases on July 18. The United States reported more than 70,000 for a second successive day, as the pace of growth increases. There are also rapidly increasing cases in Latin American countries like Brazil, Mexico, and Peru, as well as India and South Africa.

July 17

Statistics from John Hopkins University show that Brazil now has more than 2 million cases and India more than 1 million. The two countries have the second and third highest totals after the United States, with 3.6 million.

July 14

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University indicate that the total number of worldwide cases has reached 13 million. The current global pace is 1 million new cases every five days, with the United States, Brazil, and India showing the greatest increases.

July 12

The WHO’s figures indicate 230,370 new cases for the day globally, breaking the July 10 record of 228,000. The Americas now have a total of 6.54 million cases, or more than half of the global total. Southern and Western states in the United States are seeing infections climb at an accelerating rate; the country has seen some 60,000 new cases each day for four days in a row, according to Johns Hopkins University.

July 11

Johns Hopkins University statistics show Brazil to have passed 1.8 million total infections, after seeing 30,000–50,000 new cases detected each day for several days running. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, however, remains opposed to restrictions that might impact the economy. 

July 9

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that the United States now has 3 million cases, accounting for around one quarter of the 12 million cases worldwide. States like Florida, Texas, and Arizona face an increasingly serious situation. 

July 8

Brazilian President Bolsonaro announces that he has tested positive for COVID-19 (July 7 local time). Brazil has the second highest number of cases worldwide after the United States. Bolsonaro has played down COVID-19 as being like flu, refused to wear a mask, and criticized economic restrictions introduced by local governments to contain the outbreak.

July 6

India’s total cases rise to 697,000, meaning it now has the third highest number behind the United States and Brazil. As Pakistan has 230,000 and Bangladesh 160,000, South Asia is currently experiencing rapid growth second only to that in the Americas.

July 4

World Health Organization statistics show the highest daily total for new cases to date at 212,326. Cases are rapidly increasing in the United States, Brazil, and India.

June 29

The number of global fatalities rises above 500,000, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. It is around six months since the first reports emerged of a pneumonia outbreak of unknown cause in Wuhan, China. There have been 125,700 fatalities in the United States and 57,000 in Brazil, and these two countries account for more than a third of the overall total.

June 28

The number of global cases rises above 10 million, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. Brazil reports 40,000 new cases again, while continuing record numbers of daily cases in the United States increase fears of a second wave. Cases are also increasing rapidly in South Asia.

June 27

Statistics from John Hopkins University show that the United States sets a record for new daily cases with more than 45,000, with the situation becoming more serious in southern states like Florida and Texas. Brazil also reports around 40,000 new cases for the fourth successive day, while India reports 18,000 to bring its total above 500,000.

June 26

The United States reports more than 40,000 new cases for the first time. States like Texas, California, Florida, and Arizona in the south and west have seen particularly rapid increases as the country’s second wave takes shape. Brazil has reported around 40,000 cases for three successive days, and the Americas are becoming the epicenter of the pandemic. However, cases are also increasing in South Asia and the Middle East.

June 25

There are now 9.5 million cases worldwide according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, with 480,000 fatalities. The United States has reported more than 30,000 daily cases over the past three days, as a second wave takes shape. Brazil has had between 20,000 and 40,000 daily cases almost every day through June. The pace of infections is also increasing in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Middle East.

June 23

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now 9 million cases worldwide, with 470,000 fatalities. The number of cases is contininuing to grow rapidly in Brazil, Peru, and Chile, while the pace of growth is starting to increase in India and the Middle East. The World Health Organization warns that the pandemic is accelerating.

June 20

Brazil now has more than 1 million cases, according to statistics from  Johns Hopkins University, and almost 50,000 fatalities. It is the second country to reach 1 million cases after the United States. Although the number of cases started to increase in late March, President Jair Bolsonaro has opposed such preventive measures as staying indoors. Poor favela neighborhoods in urban areas have been particularly hard hit.

June 18

Statistics from John Hopkins University show that the number of cases in Brazil increase by 32,000 in one day to 955,000. Brazil has the second highest number of cases worldwide after the United States. There are now three South American countries in the global top 10 for cases, as Peru is seventh with 241,000 and Chile is ninth with 221,000. 

The following graph zooms in to focus on changes in Japan and South Korea. In Japan, there was a rapid increase from early April to mid-May, but this has slowed down since. The reopening of the economy in late May in South Korea has brought a slight increase in the pace of growth in infections.

June 11

The United States now has 2 million cases, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, with 113,000 fatalities. Both represent 27% of the global total.

June 8

Today’s Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare report shows that India now has almost 250,000 cases, the fifth highest worldwide, ahead of Spain and Italy.

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now 7 million cases worldwide and 400,000 fatalities. Brazil has seen a particularly rapid rise from May and now has more than 600,000 cases.

June 4

The number of cases in Brazil continues to increase rapidly, and has now reached a total of 584,000 after growing by 29,000 over each of the past two days.

June 1

The number of cases in Brazil has grown sixfold in one month, from 85,000 on May 1 to 515,000 on June 1. Peru and Chile are also seeing a rise in cases, while Russia now has more than 400,000.

May 31

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now 6 million cases worldwide, 10 days after the global total reached 5 million. The United States has the most cases with 1.8 million. While the pace of increase has slowed in Europe, the number of cases has grown more than fivefold in Brazil in May to 465,000. Infections continue to spread in other Latin American countries like Peru, Chile, and Mexico.

May 29

Brazil’s total number of cases has grown fivefold in less than a month, from 85,000 on May 1 to 438,000 on May 29. There have also been significant rises in other Latin American countries like Peru, Chile, and Mexico.

May 28

The United States has now experienced more than 100,000 fatalities, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. While its pace of increase has dropped overall, some areas that have reopened their economies have seen a rising number of infections, and the battle with the coronavirus is far from over in the country. Worldwide, there are now 5.7 million cases and more than 350,000 fatalities. 

May 26

Johns Hopkins University statistics show that there are now 5.5 million cases worldwide with more than 340,000 fatalities. While the pace of increase has slowed in Europe and the United States, the overall total is being driven by rises in Brazil and Russia, which now both have more than 350,000 cases. The number of cases continues to rise quickly in Peru, Chile, and Ecuador.

May 23

Brazil now has 330,000 cases, the second highest total worldwide, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. In April, infections started to spread in Brazil, with the pace increasing from May. The country has had more than 20,000 fatalities. As President Bolsonaro plays down COVID-19 as a “little flu” and calls for reopening the economy early, infections appear set to spread further. The number of cases is also increasing rapidly in Peru, Chile, and Ecuador.

May 21

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there are now more than 5 million cases worldwide. With 1.6 million, the United States accounts for 30% of these. While the pace of growth has dropped in many European countries that saw rapid increases from March to April, Russia and Brazil have experienced explosive increases since mid-April, with both now having around 300,000 cases. Peru and Mexico are also seeing rapid increases, as Latin America is becoming a new epicenter of the pandemic.

May 19

The United States now has more than 1.5 million cases, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, with over 90,000 fatalities. It accounts for around a third of the 4.8 million cases worldwide, and New York State alone has 350,000.

May 17

As the pace of increase in new infections slows in Europe, social and economic activities begin to restart, including Bundesliga soccer matches in Germany. Elsewhere, however, rapid growth in Russia and Brazil continues, the number of cases in Peru and India each rise above those for China, and Saudi Arabia has more than 50,000 cases.

May 15

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there have now been over 300,000 fatalities worldwide. The United States has had most with 85,000, followed by Britain with 34,000, and Italy with 31,000. The total number of infections is at 4.4 million, with the United States accounting for around a third with 1.4 million. While the pace of growth is now slowing somewhat in Europe and the United States, it is rising in South America and South Asia.

May 13

With more than 230,000 cases, Russia now has the second highest total worldwide, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. It managed to keep its total low until early April, but showed a rapid rise from the mid-April period. Its reported fatalities are still only just over 2,000, however, which is an order of magnitude lower than countries like Spain, Britain, and Italy with a similar number of infections.

May 12

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that the United States has now had more than 80,000 fatalities with 1.34 million cases. Both represent around a third of the global total. Russia has 220,000 cases, leaving it just behind Britain and Spain, which have the highest totals for Europe.

May 10

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announces a planned gradual easing of the lockdown imposed since March. This will include lifting the restriction allowing people to go outside for exercise only once a day and encouraging the restart of industries where working from home is impossible, such as manufacturing and construction. Retailers would then be able to restart business from June. Britain has more than 200,000 cases, and has the second highest number of fatalities worldwide after the United States, with 31,500. 

Johns Hopkins University statistics show that the United States has 1.3 million cases, accounting for around a third of the global total. Russia cannot slow down its own rise, with cases approaching 210,000, while the pace of growth is also climbing in Brazil and India. Meanwhile, in China and South Korea, where new cases had almost stopped, measures aimed at easing restrictions have led to new clusters.

The number of global cases hits 4 million, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, while fatalities reach 278,000. It is 12 days since the total cases hit 3 million on April 28. While the pace of increase has dropped in Italy and Spain, it is rising in countries like Russia, Brazil, and Peru.

May 8

The US Labor Department publishes statistics showing that unemployment rose from 4.4% in March to 14.7% in April, its highest level since the end of World War II. The loss of 20.5 million jobs is the largest drop since statistics were first kept in 1939.

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that the number of cases worldwide has risen above 3.86 million, with fatalities approaching 270,000. The United States has reached 1.25 million cases, while in Europe, the number of cases in Britain is approaching that for Italy and Spain, where the pace of growth has slowed. Russia has seen a rapid increase in infections since the start of May and now has the fifth highest number worldwide. Both Russia and Brazil are recording 10,000 new cases daily.

May 6

Cases in Britain continue to climb, as its fatalities rise above 30,000 to reach the second highest total worldwide, ahead of Italy but behind the United States. With its third straight day of 10,000 or more new cases, Russia sees its total rise above 150,000. In South America, Brazil now has 110,000 cases overall, and Peru 50,000.

Statistics compiled by Johns Hopkins University indicate that the United States has suffered 70,000 fatalities. This amounts to 27.7% of the global total. It also has more than 1.2 million cases, or 32.8% of the total worldwide.

May 5

The number of global fatalities reaches 250,000, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. The figure has quintupled in around a month from 50,000 on April 3.

May 4

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that the number of global COVID-19 cases have now risen above 3.5 million. The pace of increase has slowed in countries like Italy, Spain, and France, but Russia records its first day of 10,000 new cases. In South America, Brazil now has 100,000 cases and Peru 45,000.

May 1

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus extends the body’s declaration of a global health emergency over the coronavirus. This comes some three months after it made an initial statement of emergency on January 30. While the outbreak appears to have passed its peak in some countries, there are still concerns about further growth in infections in areas with more limited medical resources.

Russia appears unable to stop the spread of infections, despite going into lockdown from the end of March, and now has 106,000 cases. On April 30, Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin announced that he had tested positive and began self-isolating.

April 30

New York State reports more than 300,000 cases. In the United States, which now has 1 million cases, there are moves toward restarting economic activities in many states, but New York Governor Andrew Cuomo remains cautious on the matter.

April 29

The US Commerce Department announces that GDP fell at a 4.8% annual rate in the United States in the first quarter of 2020, its biggest drop since the 8.4% decrease in the last quarter of 2008.

The United States now has more than 1 million cases, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. It accounts for around a third of the global total of infections and a quarter of fatalities.

April 28

Johns Hopkins University statistics show that there have now been more than 3 million global COVID-19 cases. The United States has had 973,000, approaching one third of the total, while cases in the United States, Spain, Italy, Germany, France, and Britain add up to more than 60%.

April 26

According to statistics from Johns Hopkins University, there have now been more than 200,000 COVID-19 fatalities worldwide. Of these 53,000 took place in the United States, 26,000 in Italy, 22,000 in both Spain and France, and 20,000 in Britain. These five countries account for 140,000 deaths, or 70% of global fatalities. The total number of cases stands at 2.88 million, of which 926,000 are in the United States.

April 25

In South America, where the outbreak is becoming more serious, the number of cases in Brazil rises above 50,000, while both Ecuador and Peru have more than 20,000.

April 24

The number of global cases rises by more than 80,000 in one day to 2.66 million, and fatalities approach 190,000. In China and South Korea, which suffered many infections in the early stages of the outbreak, there are just 6 new cases each and no fatalities.

April 20

The New York Mercantile Exchange crude oil price turns negative for the first time ever due to plummeting demand, falling to –$37.63 per barrel.

April 19

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there have been more than 2.3 million COVID-19 cases and more than 160,000 fatalities. The United States has had about 30% of the global total at 720,000 cases, while New York State alone has had 240,000 cases and 12,000 fatalities.

April 18

The number of global COVID-19 deaths rises above 150,000, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. Of these, 36,700 took place in the United States, 22,700 in Italy, and 19,600 in Spain.

April 16

April 15

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show global totals of over 2 million cases and more than 130,000 fatalities. The United States has 640,000, or around a third of all cases. New York State alone has recorded 213,700 cases and 11,000 fatalities.

April 12

The United States now has 524,903 cases and 20,389 fatalities, according to statistics from Johns Hopkins University. Its fatalities now exceed those of Italy. Around 40% of US deaths have taken place in New York State.

The graph below, capped at 250,000 cases to make it easier to compare national figures, does not encompass the far higher US total of more than 500,000. While the pace of increase in Italy has slowed somewhat, it is accelerating in Spain and Britain.

April 11

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show that there have now been more than 100,000 COVID-19 fatalities worldwide. Of these 73% took place in Italy, the United States, Spain, France, and Britain.

April 5

The number of cases in the United States rises to 300,000, of which 120,000 are in New York State. There are 1.17 million cases worldwide, of which around half are in the United States, Spain, and Italy. These three countries also account for 55% of global fatalities, with a combined total of 35,397.

April 4

At 277,000, the number of cases in the United States rises to a quarter of the global total. New York State alone has 113,000, or around the same as Italy and Spain combined.

April 3

The total number of cases worldwide rises over 1 million, and there have now been more than 50,000 fatalities. At 240,000, the United States accounts for almost a quarter of all infections. In Europe, both Italy and Spain have had more than 100,000 cases and 10,000 fatalities. Restrictions in both countries on going outside and substantive halts to economic activities have shown little effect in slowing down the spread of infections.

The number of infections in the United States rises 27,000 in one day to over 210,000. New York State now has more than 83,000 cases, which is more than the officially given total for China. The number of cases in Spain approaches the figure for Italy. 

April 1

The Wimbledon tennis tournament is canceled for the first time since World War II. It had been set to take place from June 29 to July 12.

March 31

Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare statistics, as of noon of March 31, show that the United States has 162,000 cases. Some 40% of these, or 66,497 cases, are in New York State. The number of cases in Italy increases above 100,000, while infections continue to rise in Spain and Germany.

March 29

MHLW statistics, as of noon of March 29, show that the United States has 122,666 cases, or around five times as many as the 25,494 cases of a week earlier. New York State is most seriously affected, with 52,318 cases. Fatalities in Italy have risen above 10,000, while infections continue to rise rapidly in Spain and Germany.

March 27

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announces that he has tested positive for the coronavirus, and that he is self-isolating with mild symptoms.

March 26

Statistics from Johns Hopkins University show the United States as now having the most number of cases worldwide with 83,507, followed by China with 81,782, and Italy with 80,589. New York State alone has 37,258 cases and faces shortages of hospital beds and respirators.

March 25

Prince Charles of Britain is reported to have been infected. He has mild symptoms and is self-isolating.

March 23

The Canadian Olympic Committee announces that Canada will not send a team to the Tokyo 2020 Games, urging the events to be postponed for one year. The Australian Olympic Committee, too, states that “Australian athletes should prepare for a Tokyo Olympic Games in the northern summer of 2021.” 

March 22

Italy’s health ministry announces that the number of infections nationwide has risen to 59,138 and related fatalities to 5,476. Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte says the country is facing its gravest crisis since World War II and that all activities will be shut down apart from those that are strictly necessary.

March 20

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announces a stay-at-home order applying to all nonessential workers within the state to go into effect from March 22. California also issued a stay-at-home order on March 19.

March 16

March 15

The German government shuts down borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Denmark, and Luxembourg for an indefinite period. The only exemptions are for transportation of goods, commuters, and citizens returning to the country.

March 14

Spain enters a state of national emergency, as Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez imposes a lockdown in which people should only go out to buy necessary supplies. His wife Begoña Gómez tests positive for the coronavirus.

March 13

US Major League Baseball delays the start of its season, fixtures in soccer leagues across Europe and the US Masters golf tournament are postponed, and tennis tours are disrupted.

US President Donald Trump declares a state of national emergency, making $50 billion available to tackle the coronavirus outbreak.

March 12

March 11

In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges over 1,400 points. President Trump announces new measures, including an entry ban from European countries, excluding Britain.

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros declares the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic and calls on countries to take “urgent and aggressive action” to contain it.

Italy becomes the second country after China to report more than 10,000 cases. The number of people infected has more than doubled from 4,636 as of March 7 to 10,149.

March 10

As the number of infections in Italy spikes, the Japanese government decides to refuse entry to people who have been in Lombardy and four other provinces of the country.

(Originally published in Japanese. Banner photo: The largely deserted departures lobby at Kansai International Airport on March 9, 2020. © Jiji.)

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