Features Japan Data
Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Venues
[2017.02.08] Read in: 日本語 |

The venues for events in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games have now been decided. They are listed here, along with details on how to get to each one and other information.

Olympic Games Paralympic Games
Opening and closing ceremonies 1 Opening and closing ceremonies 1
Aquatics (swimming, diving, synchronized swimming, water polo) 12, 20, 21 Archery 19
Archery 19 Athletics 1
Athletics 1 Badminton 3
Badminton 23 Boccia 9
Baseball/softball 29 Canoeing 17
Basketball 25 Cycling 34
Boxing 7 Equestrian 22
Canoeing and kayaking 17, 18 Five-a-side soccer 14
Cycling 5, 10, 34, 35 Goalball 28
Equestrian 16, 22 Jūdō 4
Fencing 28 Powerlifting 6
Golf 27 Rowing 17
Gymnastics 9 Shooting 26
Handball 3 Sitting volleyball 28
Hockey 15 Swimming 20
Jūdō 4 Table tennis 2
Karate 4 Taekwondo 28
Modern pentathlon 23, 24 Triathlon 12
Rowing 17 Wheelchair basketball 8, 23
Rugby sevens 24 Wheelchair fencing 28
Sailing 33 Wheelchair rugby 3
Shooting 26 Wheelchair tennis 11
Skateboarding 14
Soccer 1, 24, 30, 31, 36, 37
Sport climbing 14
Surfing 32
Table tennis 2
Taekwondo 28
Tennis 11
Triathlon 12
Volleyball 8, 13
Weightlifting 6
Wrestling 28

Venues in the Tokyo Area

1. Olympic Stadium (National Stadium) (new venue)

Olympics: Opening and closing ceremonies, athletics, soccer
Paralympics: Opening and closing ceremonies, athletics

  • Capacity: 80,000 (during the Olympics). Scheduled for completion in November 2019. Designed by Kuma Kengo.
  • Access: On foot from Sendagaya Station or Shinanomachi Station on the JR Chūō-Sōbu Line.
  • Nearby sightseeing spots: Jingū Gaien, Aoyama, Omotesandō.

Artist’s impression of inside view of Olympic Stadium (top) and track-and-field events. (Design Works and Construction Works of Taisei Corporation, Azusa Sekkei Co., Ltd., and Kengo Kuma and Associates JV/Courtesy of JSC)

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2. Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium

Olympics: Table tennis
Paralympics: Table tennis

  • Reconstructed in 1990 based on a design by Maki Fumihiko. Renovated in 2012.
  • Access: Directly from Sendagaya Station on the JR Chūō-Sōbu Line.
  • On the west side of Olympic Stadium.

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3. Yoyogi National Stadium

Olympics: Handball
Paralympics: Badminton, wheelchair rugby

  • Venue for aquatics events and basketball at the 1964 Olympics. Designed by Tange Kenzō.
  • Access: On foot from Harajuku Station on the JR Yamanote Line.
  • Nearby sightseeing spots: Meiji Shrine, Yoyogi Park, Harajuku, Shibuya.

Yoyogi National Stadium (© Tokyo 2020)

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4. Nippon Budōkan

Olympics: Jūdō, karate
Paralympics: Jūdō

  • Jūdō venue at the 1964 Olympics. Also known as a large-scale concert venue. The Beatles performed here in 1966.
  • Access: On foot from Kudanshita Station on the Metro Tōzai and Hanzomon Lines and the Tōei Shinjuku Line.
  • Nearby sightseeing spots: Imperial Palace, Yasukuni Shrine.

Nippon Budōkan (© Tokyo 2020)

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5. Imperial Palace Garden

Olympics: Cycling: (Road start and finish)
Access: On foot from Nijūbashimae on the Metro Chiyoda Line or Hibiya Station on the Metro Hibiya Line.

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6. Tokyo International Forum

Olympics: Weightlifting
Paralympics: Powerlifting

  • Designed by Rafael Viñoly and opened in 1997 as a general cultural facility.
  • Access: Directly from Yūrakuchō Station on the JR Keihin-Tōhoku and Yamanote Lines and the Metro Yūrakuchō Line.
  • Nearby sightseeing spots: Imperial Palace, Hibiya Park, Ginza.

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7. Ryōgoku Sumō Hall (Kokugikan)

Olympics: Boxing

  • Completed in 1984. A major sumō venue.
  • Access: On foot from Ryōgoku Station on the JR Chūō Sōbu Line and the Tōei Ōedo Line.
  • Nearby sightseeing spots: Asakusa, Sumida River

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8. Ariake Arena (new venue)

Olympics: Volleyball
Paralympics: Wheelchair basketball (final)

  • Planned as a facility including an arena with a capacity of more than 10,000.
  • Access: On foot from Shin-Toyosu Station or Ariake-Tennis-no-Mori Station on the New Transit Yurikamome Line.

October 2015 artist’s impression of Ariake Arena (© Tokyo Metropolitan Government)

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9. Olympic Gymnastic Center (new venue)

Olympics: Gymnastics (artistic, rhythmic, and trampoline)
Paralympics: Boccia

  • A new venue with a capacity of 12,000. Tokyo Metropolitan Government will convert it for use as an exhibition hall for 10 years after the Olympics.
  • Access: On foot from Kokusai Tenjijō Station on the Rinkai Line.

March 2016 artist’s impression of Olympic Gymnastic Center interior (© Tokyo 2020)

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10. Olympic BMX Course (temporary venue)

Olympics: Cycling (BMX)

  • Planned to be built in the north of the Ariake district near the Olympic Village.
  • Access: On foot from Kokusai Tenjijō Station on the Rinkai Line.

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11. Ariake Tennis Park

Olympics: Tennis
Paralympics: Wheelchair tennis

  • The main Ariake Coliseum facility has a capacity of 10,000, an all-weather court, and a retractable roof.
  • Access: On foot from Kokusai Tenjijō Station on the Rinkai Line.

Ariake Tennis Park (© Tokyo 2020)

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12. Odaiba Marine Park

Olympics: Swimming (marathon), triathlon
Paralympics: Triathlon

Access: On foot from Daiba Station or Odaiba-Kaihinkōen Station on the New Transit Yurikamome Line.

Odaiba Marine Park (© Tokyo 2020)

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13. Shiokaze Park

Olympics: Beach volleyball

  • Next to Odaiba Marine Park.
  • Access: On foot from Daiba Station on the New Transit Yurikamome Line.

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14. Aomi Urban Sports Venue (temporary venue)

Olympics: Skateboarding, sport climbing
Paralympics: Five-a-side soccer

  • A temporary venue to be built in the Odaiba district.

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15. Marine Park Hockey Stadium (new venue)

Olympics: Hockey

  • A new stadium with artificial turf to be built in Ōi Pier Central Marine Park.
  • Access: On foot from Ōi Keibajō-mae Station on the Tokyo Monorail.

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16. Sea Forest Cross-Country Course (temporary venue)

Olympics: Equestrian (eventing, cross-country)

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17. Sea Forest Waterway (new venue)

Olympics: Canoeing/kayaking (sprint), rowing
Paralympics: Canoeing, rowing

  • Scheduled for completion in March 2019.

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18. Canoe Slalom Course (new venue)

Olympics: Canoeing/kayaking (slalom)

  • New venue to be built next to Kasai Rinkai Park.
  • Access: On foot from Kasairinkaikōen Station on the JR Keiyō Line.

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19. Dream Island Archery Field (new venue)

Olympics: Archery
Paralympics: Archery

  • Access: On foot from Shin-Kiba Station on the JR Keiyō Line, the Metro Yūrakuchō Line, and the Rinkai Line.

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20. Olympic Aquatics Center (new venue)

Olympics: Aquatics (swimming, diving, synchronized swimming)
Paralympics: Swimming

  • New venue to be built in Tatsuminomori Marine Park.
  • Access: On foot from Tatsumi Station on the Metro Yūrakuchō Line.

October 2015 artist’s impression of Olympic Aquatics Center (© Tokyo Metropolitan Government)

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21. Tatsumi International Swimming Center

Olympics: Aquatics (water polo)

  • Access: On foot from Tatsumi Station on the Metro Yūrakuchō Line.

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22. Equestrian Park

Olympics: Equestrian (dressage, eventing, jumping)
Paralympics: Equestrian

  • Equestrian venue at the 1964 Olympics.
  • Access: On foot from Sakura-Shinmachi Station on the Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line. By bus from Yōga Station on the same line.

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23. Musashino Forest Sport Center (new venue)

Olympics: Badminton, modern pentathlon (fencing)
Paralympics: Wheelchair basketball

  • New venue to be built next to Tokyo Stadium.
  • Access: On foot from Tobitakyū Station on the Keiō Line.

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24. Tokyo Stadium (Ajinomoto Stadium)

Olympics: Soccer, rugby sevens, modern pentathlon (swimming, riding, running, shooting)                           

  • A major stadium with a capacity of 50,000.
  • Access: On foot from Tobitakyū Station on the Keiō Line.

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25. Saitama Super Arena

Olympics: Basketball

  • The country’s largest multipurpose hall with a maximum capacity of 37,000.
  • Access: Directly from Saitama-Shintoshin Station on the JR Keihin-Tōhoku, Utsunomiya, and Takasaki Lines.

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26. Asaka Shooting Range (temporary venue)

Olympics: Shooting
Paralympics: Shooting

  • Access: Around 30 minutes on foot from Wakōshi Station on the Tōbu Tōjō Line and Metro Yūrakuchō and Fukutoshin Lines. By bus from Ōizumi-Gakuen Station on the Seibu Ikebukuro Line.

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27. Kasumigaseki Country Club

Olympics: Golf

  • Opened in 1929. Hosted the Canada Cup (now the World Cup of Golf) in 1957 and has hosted the Japan Open Golf Championship and Japan Women’s Open Golf Championship.
  • Access: On foot from Kasahata Station on the JR Kawagoe Line.

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28. Makuhari Messe

Olympics: Fencing, taekwondo, wrestling
Paralympics: Goalball, sitting volleyball, taekwondo, wheelchair fencing

  • Access: On foot from Kaihin-Makuhari Station on the JR Keiyō Line.

Makuhari Messe (© Tokyo 2020)

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29. Yokohama Stadium

Olympics: Baseball, softball

  • Home field of Central League baseball team Yokohama DeNA BayStars with a capacity of 30,000
  • Access: On foot from Kannai Station on the JR Keihin-Tōhoku and Negishi Lines and the Yokohama Blue Line.

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30. Saitama Stadium

Olympics: Soccer

  • Japan’s largest dedicated soccer stadium with a capacity of 63,000.
  • Access: On foot from Urawa-Misono Station on the Metro Namboku Line and the Saitama Railway Line.

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31. International Stadium Yokohama

Olympics: Soccer

  • Japan’s largest stadium with a capacity of 72,000. FIFA World Cup final venue in 2002.
  • Access: On foot from Shin-Yokohama Station on the JR Tōkaidō Shinkansen and Yokohama Lines and the Yokohama Blue Line.
  • [2017.02.08]
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